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Tropical Storm Parma (19W) Hovering Near Philippines; Super Typhoon Melor (20W) on its Way

20.6N 118.8E

October 6th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones, Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Parma (19W) - October 5th, 2009

Tropical Storm Parma (19W) - October 5th, 2009

Enhanced image

Enhanced image

Track of TS Parma (19W), left, and STY Melor (20W), right - October 5th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Parma and Melor

In a week that saw Samoa hit by a tsnuami and Indonesia shaken by an earthquake, the Philippines, caught a break: Typhoon Parma (19W) missed the capital of Manila.

Just one week after a hurricane flooded 80 percent of Manila, killing 300 people and displacing at least half a million, the devastated city has been spared a second major storm. Typhoon Parma had threatened to dump even more heavy rains over the city, trigger more landslides, and block relief efforts, reports the CSM.

Though typhoon Parma did strike the island of Luzon, where Manila is located, and kill 16 people, it then bypassed the capital and edged toward the less densely populated north.

Parma was also downgraded to a tropical storm Monday, with winds of 59 mph and gusts of up to 75 mph, according to the Associated Press. The storm is now located approximately 330 nautical miles east-southeast of Hong Kong, has remained quasi-stationary over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 30 feet.

Parma is still expected to cause severe damage, though, dumping heavy rains not just in the northern Philippines but also Taiwan, where 6,000 villagers have been evacuated. Instead of continuing on its path away from the country, it’s predicted to linger over the city of Laoag and surrounding areas until Thursday. That’s because a third typhoon, Melor (to the right in the animated image), churning in the Pacific, is acting “like a magnet” and holding Parma in place, according to Agence France-Presse.

Super Typhoon Melor (20W), on the other hand, is projected to pass over Philippine waters but not hit the mainland. It is now located approximately 500 nautical miles southeast of Okinawa, and has tracked northwestward at 14 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 40 feet.

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