Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Search Results for "hurricane ida":

Hurricane Sandy (18L) Damage Report; Remnants Still Visible Over Eastern USA – November 1st, 2012

39.2N 80.2W

November 1st, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Sandy (18L) – October 31st, 2012

The remnants of Hurricane Sandy (18L) can be observed over the USA in this image, stretching from the south to the northeast to the midwest. Many states were impacted by the storms.

High winds and waves washed sand onto coastal roads in southeastern Florida. The storm left power outages across the region. North Carolina was spared from major damage through the late evening hours of October 28, though winds, rain, and inland snow could affect the state through October 30. Several highways were flooded, and a state of emergency was declared in 24 western counties due to snow and strong winds.

On October 29, snow was falling in parts of the state of Virginia. Virginia was awarded a federal disaster declaration. At Sandy’s peak, 200,000 customers were without power, and in Northern Virginia where most of the outages occurred 92,000 customers were still without power on 30 October; the local utility intended to restore full service by 1 November.

West Virginia was also declared a federal disaster area, due to abnormally heavy snowfall. In Kentucky, the most impacted area was the Eastern region of the state where as much as eight inches of snow fell as Sandy merged with a cold front.

In Maryland, at least 100 feet of a fishing pier at the beach resort of Ocean City was destroyed. Several bridges were closed, and I-68 in far western Maryland and northern West Virginia closed due to impassable roads from heavy snow. Multiple vehicles are stranded on the interstate and the National Guard was sent out to help. Workers in Howard County, Maryland tried to stop a sewage overflow caused by a power outage October 30. Raw sewage spilled at a rate of 2 million gallons per hour. It was unclear how much sewage had flowed into the Little Patuxent River.

In Delaware, which was also declared a federal disaster area, rainfall at Rehoboth Beach totaled 6.53 inches inches by early afternoon, with nearly 7 inches at Indian River Inlet and more than 4 inches in Dover and Bear. At 4 p.m., Delmarva Power reported on its website that more than 13,900 customers in Delaware and Maryland’s Eastern Shore had lost electric service as high winds brought down trees and power lines. Delaware Route 1 is now closed by flooding from Dewey Beach to Fenwick Island.

In New Jersey, a 50-foot piece of the Atlantic City Boardwalk washed away. Half the city of Hoboken is flooded. In the early morning of October 30, authorities in Bergen County, New Jersey, are evacuating residents after a berm overflowed and flooded several communities. Police Chief of Staff Jeanne Baratta says there are up to 5 feet of water in the streets of Moonachie and Little Ferry.

In Pennsylvania, several bridges and highways were closed, and more than 1.2 million were left without power as a result of the storm. Storm impacts in Upstate New York were much more limited than in New York City; there was some flooding and a few downed trees. Large portions of the Manhattan borough of New York City were without electricity. The East River over flowed its banks, flooding large sections of Lower Manhattan. Battery Park had a water surge of 13.88 ft. Seven subway tunnels under the East River were flooded as of October 30. Sea water flooded the Ground Zero construction site.

Over 385,000 customers in Massachusetts were without power as of the afternoon of October 29, and flooding of roadways and buildings was reported. In New Hampshire, over 200,000 customers were without power as of late Monday, October 29. In Rhode Island, over 100,000 customers lost power during the storm. In Ohio, on October 30, at least 247,000 in northeast Ohio were without power, mostly in the Cleveland area. In Michigan, more than 120,000 customers were without power at one point, but as of 9 p.m. Tuesday, only 45,000 are still without power. The National Weather Service said that waves up to 23 feet high were reported on southern Lake Huron.

Hurricane Sandy (18W) Threatening East Coast of USA

29.5N 80.5W

October 28th, 2012 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Sandy (18L) – October 27th, 2012

Enhanced image

Track of Hurricane Sandy (18L) - October 27th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 18L

As of 5 p.m. EDT (2100 UTC) October 27, Hurricane Sandy is located within 25 nautical miles of 30.2°N 75.2°W, about 335 mi (540 km) east-southeast of Charleston, South Carolina and about 345 mi (555 km) south of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

Maximum sustained winds are 65 knots (75 mph, 120 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 961 millibars (hPa; 28.38 inHg), and the system is moving northeast at 11 kt (13 mph, 20 km/h). Hurricane force winds extend up to 105 miles (165 km) from the center of Sandy, and tropical storm force winds up to 520 miles (835 km) from the center.

Sandy continues to be a large and dangerous system and poses a major threat to portions of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. Residents from New England to New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia should begin to prepare for Sandy.

Effects from Sandy could potentially begin as early as Sunday and peak in intensity Monday into Tuesday. The latest projected path takes the center of Sandy into the Northeast coast between Long Island and the Del-Mar-Va Peninsula.

Hurricane Isaac (09L) West-Southwest of New Orleans, USA – August 29th, 2012

28.9N 86.2W

August 29th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Tropical Storm Isaac (09L) – August 27th, 2012

Enhanced image

Track of Hurricane  Isaac (09L) - August 29th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Hurricane Isaac

At about 16:20 UTC on August 28, Isaac attained hurricane status about 75 mi (115 km) south-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River, based on data from the Hurricane Hunters.

As of 12 p.m. CDT (1700 UTC) August 29, Hurricane Isaac (09L) is located within 15 nautical miles of 29.7°N 90.8°W, about 10 mi (15 km) northwest of Houma, Louisiana and about 45 mi (75 km) west-southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana.

Maximum sustained winds are 65 knots (75 mph, 120 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 973 mbar (hPa; 28.73 InHg), and the system is moving northwest at 5 kt (6 mph, 9 km/h). Hurricane force winds extend up to 45 miles (75 km) from the center of Isaac, and tropical storm force winds up to 175 miles (280 km) from the center.

Hurricane Rina Moving Close to Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico – October 27th, 2011

19.8N 86.9W

October 27th, 2011 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Rina (18L) - October 25th, 2011

Enhanced image

Track of Hurricane Rina (18L) - October 26th, 2011 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Hurricane Rina (18L)

At 7:00 AM CDT (1200 UTC) the center of Hurricane Rina was located near latitude 18.9 north, longitude 87.0 west. Rina is moving toward the northwest near 6 mph (9 km/h).

A gradual turn to the north with a slight increase in forward speed is expected today. On the forecast track, the center of Rina will be moving near or over the east coast of the Yucatan Peninsula tonight and Friday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph (120 km/h) with higher gusts. Rina is a category one hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. Weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, and Rina could become a tropical storm later today.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 15 miles (30 km) from the center, and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 85 miles (140 km). The estimated minimum central pressure is 988 mb (29.18 inches).

Hazards affecting land include wind, rainfall and storm surge. Tropical storm conditions are likely occurring over portions of the tropical storm warning area. Hurricane conditions
are expected within the hurricane warning area later today.

Rina is expected to produce rainfall amounts of 3 to 6 inches over the eastern Yucatan Peninsula and Cozumel through Friday with isolated maximum amounts to 10 inches. A dangerous storm surge will raise water levels by as much as 2 to 4 feet above normal tide levels along the immediate coast near and to the right of the track of the center. Near the coast, the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves.

Katia (12L) Back to Category One Hurricane Strength – September 8th, 2011

25.6N 72.8W

September 8th, 2011 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Katia (12L) - September 7th, 2011

Enhanced image

Track of TS 12L  - September 8th, 2011 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 12L

The center of Hurricane Katia (12L) is located near latitude 30.8 north, longitude 70.0 west. Katia is moving toward the north-northwest near 13 mph (20 km/h).

The hurricane is expected to turn to the north by Thursday morning, followed by a north-northeastward motion with an increase in forward speed Thursday night and Friday. On the forecast track, the center of Katia will move between the east coast of the United States and Bermuda through Thursday.

Maximum sustained winds remain near 80 mph (130 km/h) with higher gusts. Katia is a category one hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. Little change in strength is forecast during the next couple of days.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center, and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 205 miles (335 km). A sustained wind of 67 mph with a gust to 83 mph was recently reported. Estimated minimum central pressure is 982 mb (29.00 inches).

Hazards affecting land include surf, wind and rainfall. Large swells generated by Katia will continue to affect most of the east coast of the United States, Bermuda and east-facing beaches of the Bahamas during the next couple of days. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. Tropical-storm-force winds, especially in gusts, are possible in Bermuda through Thursday. Katia is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 1 to 2 inches across Bermuda.