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Posts tagged Zanzibar

Zanzibar and Pemba Northeast of Dar es Salaam,Tanzania – February 23rd, 2012

6.8S 39.2E

February 23rd, 2012 Category: Image of the day

Tanzania - February 9th, 2012

Visible as a white area along the coast of this wide-swath ASAR image of Tanzania is Dar es Salaam, the largest city in the country. The city is situated on a massive natural harbour on the Eastern Indian Ocean coast of Africa, with sandy beaches in some areas. Visible offshore is the Zanzibar Archipelago, in particular the large islands of Zanzibar (closer to Dar es Salaam) and Pemba (further northeast).

Zanzibar is a semi-autonomous part of Tanzania, in East Africa. It comprises the Zanzibar Archipelago in the Indian Ocean, 25–50 kilometres (16–31 mi) off the coast of the mainland, and consists of numerous small islands and two large ones: Unguja (the main island, informally referred to as Zanzibar), and Pemba. Pemba is situated about 50 kilometres to the north of the Unguja (the island proper of Zanzibar). Most of the island, which is hillier and more fertile than Zanzibar, is dominated by small scale farming.

Vegetation Index of Coastal Kenya and Tanzania

4.6S 38.7E

December 14th, 2011 Category: Vegetation Index

Kenya and Tanzania - December 11th, 2011

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index by the border of Kenya (above) and Tanzania (below), on the eastern coast of the African continent. Visible off the coast are the islands of Pemba (above) and Zanzibar (below).

Photosynthetic activity is generally good (green) throughout the image, particularly near the coast. Some areas of high activity (rusty red) can be observed near the coast and further inland. Areas of low activity (yellow) are visible inland but not along the coast.

Zanzibar Archipelago Off Coast of Tanzania

6.1S 39.2E

December 6th, 2011 Category: Snapshots

Tanzania - November 14th, 2011

Visible on the right side of this APM image, off the coast of Tanzania, is Zanzibar, a semi-autonomous part of Tanzania, in East Africa. It comprises the Zanzibar Archipelago in the Indian Ocean, 25–50 kilometres (16–31 mi) off the coast of the mainland.

The archipelago consists of numerous small islands and two large ones: Unguja (the main island, informally referred to as Zanzibar), and Pemba. Zanzibar is mainly low lying, its highest point is 120 metres. It is 108 km long and 32 .km wide, with an area of 2,461 km2 (950 sq mi).

Coral Reefs by Bajuni Archipelago, Somalia

0.9S 42.0E

June 15th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Somalia - June 3rd, 2009

Somalia - June 3rd, 2009

Somalia is the African country with the longest national coastline, at 3025 km, with an estimated shelf area (depth 0–200 m) of 32 500 km2.

From Ras Caseyr to the Kenya border, the coast runs north-east to south-west. An important feature found along the southern Somali shoreline is the Bajuni Archipelago in the Indian Ocean.

This archipelago consists of islands, islets and skerries, forming a barrier island separated from the coast by a narrow marine sound, from Kismayu to Ras Kiyamboni.

They lie at the northern end of a string of reefs which also include Zanzibar and Pemba. There are six main islands: Chandra, Chovaye, Chula (the only island with a significant population), Koyama, Darakasi and Ngumi.

Areas such as this along the southern Somali coast form part of the Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystem, encompassing 700 000 km2, and extending 800 km between Dar es Salaam and Ras Hafun. Abundant biomass develops here due to upwelling.

The shelf area has a wide variety of coral reefs, mangroves, seagrass meadows, beaches and estuaries. In shallow water areas the abraded flats are colonized by scattered coral communities with variable cover. A true fringing reef is achieved in places only in the Bajuni Archipelago, and around the Bajuni barrier island there is more diversity.

Large-scale alteration produced by man on the Somali coast is relatively recent, but has accelerated in the last few decades, especially around major cities. This alteration affects especially backshore areas where the Pleistocene coral reefs are quarried.

At present, the continental shelf is not adequately monitored or protected, so coastal habitats are being degraded, living marine resources are overexploited, and pollution levels are increasing, all of which affect natural resources and biodiversity, reports the Marine Pollutin Bulletin.

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