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Posts tagged Yangtze River

Sediments, Haze and Various Cloud Phenomena Near Yangtze River Mouth, China

31.2N 121.4E

March 21st, 2013 Category: Clouds, Sediments

China – March 21st, 2013

The Yangtze River empties a thick load of sediments into the waters of the Yellow Sea, tinging them gold and making apparent the reason for the sea’s name. To the northwest, haze hangs over the plain near Beijing and over the Bohai Sea. East of the rivermouth, two other kinds of atmospheric phenomena can be observed: wave clouds (the straight, parallel lines of clouds) and van Kármán vortex streets (the clouds organized into two rows of spirals).

Haze Over Yangtze River Mouth, China

31.2N 121.4E

March 18th, 2013 Category: Clouds, Sediments

China – March 10th, 2013

Haze that is likely a combination of smog and dust from a dust storm spreading across China hovers over the mouth of the Yangtze River and blows eastward, south of the Korean Peninsula, towards Japan. Partially visible through the haze are sediments from the Yangtze. Sediments and phytoplankton growth also color the waters of the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea.

Haze Over Shanghai and Yangtze River Mouth, China

31.2N 121.4E

February 11th, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Clouds, Rivers, Sediments

China – January 25th, 2013

Haze hangs in the air over Shanghai (bottom right), the mouth of the Yangtze River and the surrounding area. Haze refers to weather with air humidity of 80 percent or below, and is different from fog, which occurs when humidity in the air is more than 90 percent. It forms when concentrations of dust and smog in the air are high.

Shanghai, like Beijing, classifies haze as light, moderate or heavy. Light haze means that outdoor visibility is between five and ten kilometers; with moderate haze, visibility is between two and five kilometers; heavy haze means visibility is less than two kilometers.

Experts said that haze contains substances harmful to the respiratory tract and lungs so people should stay indoors during moderate and heavy haze days. Long exposure to haze can lead to coryza, bronchitis and even lung cancer.

Haze Over Northeastern China, From Shanghai to Beijing

39.9N 116.4E

January 28th, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Clouds, Rivers

China – January 26th, 2013

A thick haze hangs over the plains northeastern China, thinning near the coast. It veils cities including Shanghai (bottom center) and Beijing (upper left quadrant), as well as the mouth of the Yangtze River (by Shanghai), and reaches the shores of the Bohai Sea (above center).

Haze forms when concentrations of dust, smoke and/or pollutants in the air are high. Since it contains substances harmful to the respiratory tract and lungs, last year Chinese authorities set tougher rules to combat air pollution by ordering all big cities to monitor tiny particles that do serious damage to health. Stricter air pollution monitoring standards were ordered for Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing, Tianjin, 27 provincial capitals and three industrial belts: the Yangtze and Pearl river deltas and Beijing’s hinterland. Another 113 cities must adopt new standards next year and all but the smallest cities by 2015.

 

Haze Over Eastern China – December 28th, 2012

31.2N 121.4E

December 28th, 2012 Category: Image of the day

China – December 24th, 2012

Haze hangs over eastern China, particularly in the lowlands between ridges of hills and mountains and across the coastal plain by the mouth of the Yangtze River. The haze is likely a combination of dust and air pollution. In winter in China, poor air quality often the result of a temperature inversion that causes a layer of cold, dense air to become trapped beneath a more buoyant layer of warm air. As long as the temperature inversion persists, pollution builds in the trapped pocket of air near the ground.

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