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Posts tagged Yangon River

Sediments Coloring Waters of Gulf of Martaban, Myanmar

16.5N 97.0E

December 10th, 2012 Category: Rivers, Sediments

Myanmar – December 3rd, 2012

Sediments create tan and blue-green patterns as they diffuse into the Gulf of Martaban, an arm of the Andaman Sea in the southern part of Myanmar. They are released into the gulf principally from the Salween Sittaung and Yangon Rivers. The gulf is famous for its extreme tides, which range between 4 and 7 meters.

Sediments in Gulf of Martaban, Myanmar

16.5N 97.0E

November 2nd, 2012 Category: Sediments

Myanmar – October 27th, 2012

Sediments from the Salween Sittaung and Yangon rivers empty into the Gulf of Martaban, in the lower half of this image. The gulf is an arm of the Andaman Sea in the southern part of Myanmar. It is known for its extreme tides, which may account for the dispersal pattern of the sediments. The edge of the highly turbid tidal zone migrates back-and-forth in-sync with every tidal cycle by nearly 150 km.

Gulf of Martaban Showing Fewer Sediments, Myanmar

16.8N 96.8E

April 23rd, 2012 Category: Sediments

Myanmar - April 14th, 2012

The Gulf of Martaban is an arm of the Andaman Sea in the southern part of Burma. The Salween Sittaung and Yangon rivers empty into it, and its waters usually appear opaque tan due to sediments, from the upper to the lower reaches. However, in this image fewer sediments are visible (click here for other images of the gulf). This difference may be due to a lack of rain or to changes in the tides.

Sediments in Irrawaddy River Delta and Gulf of Martaban, Myanmar

16.1N 94.4E

November 16th, 2011 Category: Rivers, Sediments

Myanmar - November 8th, 2011

In southern Myanmar, sediments pour forth from the delta of the Irrawaddy River (left) and from the Gulf of Martaban (right), into the Andaman Sea. The delta begins about 93 kilometres (58 mi) above Hinthada (Henzada) and about 290 kilometres (180 mi) from its curved base, which faces the Andaman Sea.

The westernmost distributary of the delta is the Pathein (Bassein) River, while the easternmost stream is the Yangon River, on the left bank of which stands Myanmar’s capital city, Yangon (Rangoon).  The relief of the delta’s landscape is low but not flat.[20] The soils consist of fine silt, which is replenished continuously by fertile alluvium carried downstream by the river.

Sediments in Ganges Delta and Gulf of Martaban, Bangladesh and Myanmar – November 11th, 2011

20.0N 93.4E

November 11th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Myanmar and Bangladesh - November 8th, 2011

Two large, sediment filled bays can be seen in this image of Bangladesh (left) and Myanmar (right). Visible in southern Myanmar is the Gulf of Martaban, filled with sediments by the Salween Sittaung and Yangon Rivers. Visible in Bangladesh is the Ganges Delta, where sediments enter into the Bay of Bengal.

The Ganges Delta (also known as the Ganges–Brahmaputra Delta, the Sunderbans Delta, or the Bengalla Delta) is a river delta in Bangladesh and the state of West Bengal, India. It is the world’s largest delta, approximately 350 km (220 mi) across at the Bay of Bengal.

A number of large rivers flow through the Ganges Delta, including the Padma (main distributary of the Ganges) and the Jamuna (main distributary of the Brahmaputra), which merge and then join the Meghna before entering the sea.

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