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Lake Michigan’s Green Bay, USA

44.5N 88W

May 6th, 2011 Category: Lakes

USA - May 1st, 2011

This thumbnail image focuses on the northern part of Lake Michigan, although the lake is visible in its entirety in the full image and part of Lake Superior can be seen above.

Visible on the left side of the image is Green Bay, an arm of Lake Michigan, located along the south coast of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and the east coast of Wisconsin. Green Bay is some 120 mi long, with a width ranging from about 10 mi to 20 mi. It is 1626 sqmi in area.

It is separated from the rest of the lake by the Door Peninsula in Wisconsin, the Garden Peninsula in Michigan, and the chain of islands between them, all formed by the Niagara Escarpment.

At the southern end of the bay is the city of Green Bay, Wisconsin, where the Fox River enters the bay. Some greenish sediments can be seen where the river enters the bay, although their influx does not appear to be particularly dense.

 

Mississippi River and Lake Superior, USA and Canada

45.9N 89.4W

April 3rd, 2011 Category: Lakes, Rivers

USA and Canada - March 30th, 2011

Lake Superior (above), the largest of the five Great Lakes of North America, is bounded to the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and the U.S. state of Minnesota, and to the south by the U.S. states of Wisconsin and Michigan.

Part of Lake Michigan can also be observed at the lower right, and the Mississippi River can be seen crossing the lower part of the image.

 

Sediments at Southern Tip of Lake Michigan, USA

43.8N 85W

November 15th, 2010 Category: Lakes

USA - November 9th, 2010

The southern shores of Lake Michigan are lined by teal sediments, while the rest of the lake, particularly the eastern shoreline, appears navy blue and mostly sediment free. The southern tip of the lake is heavily industrialized.

The only North American Great Lake located entirely within the United States, Lake Michigan is bounded, from west to east, by the states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan.

Ice and Sediments in Lake Michigan, USA – April 21st, 2010

43.4N 87.2W

April 21st, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

USA - March 5th, 2010

USA - March 5th, 2010

Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. It is bounded, from west to east, by the U.S. states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan. Although this image focuses on the southern section of the lake, parts of all four states are visible. The city of Chicago is also situated on the southwestern shores.

The beaches of the lake’s western coast and the northernmost part of the east coast are rocky, while the southern and eastern beaches are sandy and dune-covered. This is partly because of the prevailing winds from the west which also cause thick layers of ice to build up on the eastern shore in winter. Here, ice can be observed along the southeastern coastline, while greenish sediments or algae border both the western and eastern shores.

Shorelines of the Great Lakes, USA and Canada – April 17th, 2009

April 17th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Great Lakes, USA and Canada - April 9th, 2009

Great Lakes, USA and Canada - April 9th, 2009

Close-up of Lake Erie

Close-up of Lake Erie

Close-up of Lake Michigan

Close-up of Lake Michigan

The Laurentian Great Lakes are a chain of freshwater lakes located in eastern North America, on the Canada – United States border. Consisting of Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario (from left to right), they form the largest group of freshwater lakes on Earth.

The lakes are bound by the Canadian province of Ontario and the U.S. states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, New York, Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Four of the five lakes form part of the Canada-United States border; the fifth, Lake Michigan, is contained entirely within the United States.

The Saint Lawrence River, which marks the same international border for a portion of its course, is the primary outlet of these interconnected lakes, and flows through Quebec and past the Gaspé Peninsula to the northern Atlantic Ocean.

Close-up of upper Lake Huron

Close-up of upper Lake Huron

Close-up of lower Lake Huron

Close-up of lower Lake Huron

These images were captured in early spring, after warmer temperatures had thawed much of the ice that frequently covers the lakes in winter. However, as can be observed in the close-ups, a patch of ice is still visible at the northernmost tip of Lake Erie, and in the marshy areas along the northern shores of Lake Huron.

Lake Erie has a substantial amont of greenish-yellow sediments clouding its waters from shore to shore. Lake Huron and Lake Michigan also have some sediments, though these are limited to their southern coastlines.

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