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Dead Sea in Jordan Rift Valley, Middle East

31.5N 35.4E

October 7th, 2011 Category: Lakes

Middle East - October 2nd, 2011

Visible parallel to the shores of the Mediterranean Sea is the Dead Sea, a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east and Israel and the West Bank to the west. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River.

Its surface and shores are 423 metres (1,388 ft) below sea level, the lowest elevation on the Earth’s surface. The Dead Sea is 377 m (1,237 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. With 33.7% salinity, it is also one of the world’s saltiest body of water, 8.6 times saltier than the ocean.

Dead Sea in Jordan Rift Valley – June 22nd, 2011

31.1N 34.8E

June 22nd, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Middle East - June 20th, 2011

This wide-swath ASAR image focuses the Dead Sea, a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east and Israel/Palestine and the West Bank to the west.

It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. The valley and river appear a lighter shade of grey.

The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point. Its surface and shores are 423 metres (1,388 ft) below sea level, the lowest elevation on the Earth’s surface on dry land.

 

Sun Glint on Sea of Galilee and Dead Sea

44.8N 73.6W

June 9th, 2010 Category: Lakes

Israel/Palestine and Jordan - June 2nd, 2010

Israel/Palestine and Jordan - June 2nd, 2010

The Dead Sea is a landlocked salt lake between Israel/Palestine and Jordan. Here, both the Dead Sea (below) and the Sea of Galilee (above) appear whitish silver due to sun glint.

The Dead Sea is the lowest body of water on Earth, it averages about 1,312 ft (400 m) below sea level. It is 50 mi (80 km) long and up to 11 mi (18 km) wide.

Its eastern shore is Jordanian, while the southern half of its western shore is Israeli; the northern half of the western shore is within the West Bank, occupied by Israel since the Six-Day War (1967).

Jordan River Flowing into the Dead Sea

31.5N 35.5E

December 27th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Dead Sea - December 19th, 2009

Dead Sea - December 19th, 2009

The Jordan River is a 251 kilometre (156 mile) long river in Southwest Asia which flows vertically through the center of this image, into the Dead Sea. The last section, between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, has the least gradient. Thus, the river begins to meander before it enters the Dead Sea, which is about 400 metres below sea level and has no outlet. Two major tributaries enter from the east during this last phase: the Yarmouk River and Jabbok River.

In 1964, Israel began operating a dam that diverts water from the Sea of Galilee, a major Jordan River water provider, to the National Water Carrier. Also in 1964, Jordan constructed a channel that diverted water from the Yarmouk River. Syria has also built reservoirs that catch the Yarmouk’s waters. Environmentalists blame Israel, Jordan and Syria for extensive damage to the Jordan River ecosystem.

In modern times, the waters are 70% to 90% used for human purposes and the flow is much reduced. Because of this and the high evaporation rate of the Dead Sea, the sea is shrinking. All the shallow waters of the southern end of the sea have been drained in modern times and are now salt flats.

In 2007, Friends of the Earth Middle East named the Jordan River as one of the world’s 100 most endangered ecological sites, due in part to lack of cooperation between Israel and the neighboring Arab states.

Countries Surrounding the Eastern Mediterranean Sea – November 6th, 2009

34.9N 33.3E

November 6th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Eastern Mediterranean - September 24th, 2009

Eastern Mediterranean - September 24th, 2009

This view of the eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea includes the island nation of Cyprus, as well as (counterclockwise along the shoreline from bottom left) Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula, Israel-Palestine, Lebanon, Syria and Turkey. Inland, Jordan and parts of Saudi Arabia and Iraq are also visible.

The dry, arid landscape occupying most of the image is interrputed by several lakes and rivers. Below, in Egypt, the Nile River Delta creates a wide, fan-shaped green area along the Mediterranean coast.

To the northeast, the Dead Sea can be seen in the Jordan Rift Valley, between Israel-Palestine and the West Bank (left) and Jordan (right). The lower part of this inland sea appears  greenish due to an extensive network of salt evaporation pans called the Dead Sea Dikes.

Continuing to the north, Lake Assad is visible in Syria, connected to the Euphrates River. North of Lake Assad is Lake Atatürk Dam, in Turkey.

Finally, also located in Turkey, at the top left, is Lake Tuz. In contrast with the other lakes seen in this image, Lake Tuz appears bright white. It is a salt lake, and the second largest lake in Turkey.

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