Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Water Pollution

Krasnoyarskoye Reservoir, Russia

55.1N 91.5E

June 21st, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Russia - June 8th, 2009

Russia - June 8th, 2009

The Krasnoyarskoye Reservoir on the Yenisei River is one of the largest man-made lakes of river origin in Siberia. It is situated in Russia’s Krasnoyarsky District, at 243m above sea level and a distance of 2,502 km from the mouth of the Yenisei.

The construction of the reservoir started in 1967 and its live storage was filled in 1970.  The back- water from the dam extends for a distance of 386 km. The Krasnoyarskoye Reservoir is of the channel type and a long-term storage regulation.

The drainage basin of the reservoir covers three natural zones, forest, forest-steppe and steppe, located in the eastern part of the Sayan Altai mountain range. These zones can be identified in the image by the green color of the forests and the tan color of the steppes.

The drainage network of the basin mainly consists of mountain rivers with narrow valleys, of which 35 enter Krasnoyarskoye Reservoir. The recharge water from the rivers is formed by melting snow and precipitation of summer- autumn period.

The water resources of the reservoir are used for electric power generation at the Krasnoyarsk hydro-electric power station (capacity 6x106kWh). Annual power production is 20×109 kW.

The reservoir is also used for navigation, transportation and commercial fishing during the ice free period. Further, its water is used for irrigation in the steppe region of the basin.

Environmental threats to the reservoir include pollution and lake shore erosion. The major sources of pollution are mining industry wastewater and domestic sewage from the cities of Abakan and Tchernogorsk. The projects to deal with both problems are bank reinforcement, removal of floating and sinking timbers, sewage treatment, and filling shallow parts of the lake for agricultural development.

Deltas and Wetlands of the Caspian Sea – June 10th, 2009

43.0N 49.9E

June 10th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Caspian Sea - June 3rd, 2009

Caspian Sea - June 3rd, 2009

Volga River Delta

Volga River Delta

Ural River Delta

Ural River Delta

Various types of wetland and delta areas can be found on the shores of the Caspian Sea. The northern section of this immense lake is encompassed by the Caspian Depression, a low-lying flatland region.

The depression, which covers approximately 200,000 kilometers² (77,220 miles²), lies at the southern end of the Ryn Desert, and is in both Kazakhstan and Russia.

The Volga River and the Ural River, which forms part of the traditional boundary between Europe and Asia, flow into the Caspian Sea through this region. The deltas of the Ural and Volga Rivers are extensive wetlands.

Both deltas can be observed in detail in their respective close-ups. The fan-shaped Volga River Delta has, unfortunately, experienced significant wetland loss due to industrial and agricultural modification to the delta plain. Much of the water in and around the delta appears bright green due to algal blooms, intensified by fertilizers carried in by the river.

Tengiz Field

Tengiz Field

Kura River and wetlands

Kura River and wetlands

In fact, studies have shown that water pollution, mostly coming from the Volga River, poses a serious threat to the biodiversity of the Caspian Depression. Water pollution is contributed mainly by industrial, agricultural, and household discharges.

The Ural River Delta in Kazakhstan has a different shape from that of the Volga: rather than a wide triangular or fan-shape, it is longer and thinner. This is called a “bird’s foot” or “digitate” delta. Such deltas are often seen on sediment-rich rivers flowing into lakes.

Much of the Caspian Depression is below the level of the sea; its lowest point is 28m (92 ft) below sea level. Its eastern region comprises large areas of marshlands. One such marshy area in western Kazakhstan is the location of the Tengiz Field (see close-up), a huge source of oil.

The final close-up focuses on the western shore of the Caspian Sea, in Azerbaijan. Here, the Kura River enters the sea, discharging sediments. Onland, the dark green area in the center near the coast is swampy Gyzylaghadj State Reserve. Also called the Gizil-Agach State Reserve, it is a Ramsar Wetland that is an important wintering and nesting area for migrant, swamp and wild birds.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

November 2019
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

46


Take Action

Widgets