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Posts tagged Washington State

Hazy Skies Northwest of Snake River Plain, USA

46.1N 119W

August 17th, 2010 Category: Rivers

USA- August 29th, 2010

Fog or smoke from wildfires in hovers in the air over Puget Sound (upper left quadrant), in Washington State, USA, near the border with Canada.  Clouds can also be seen hugging the Pacific coastline and moving over parts of the fertile green land near the shore.

As one moves inland, this dark green turns to golden brown. Areas of green agriculture can be seen across the region, however, particularly near the Snake River. The river flows westwards through the Snake River Plain, and turns north to empty into the Columbia River in the state of Washington.

Steep mountains, low hills, deep canyons and predominantly, the flat alluvium of the Snake River Plain characterize the geologically diverse and active watershed of the Snake River.

Puget Sound and Snake River in Washington State, USA

47.9N 122.5W

August 11th, 2010 Category: Rivers

USA - August 29th, 2010

The body of water in the upper left corner is Puget Sound, a complex estuarine system of interconnected marine waterways and basins, in the US state of Washington. The sound extends approximately 100 miles (160 km) from Deception Pass in the north to Olympia, Washington in the south.

The term “Puget Sound” is used not just for the body of water but also the general region centered on the sound, including the Seattle metropolitan area, home to about 3.4 million people. This region appears as a greyish area on the shores of the sound.

Most of the area surrounding the sound and down the coastline appears fertile and green. Areas further inland are drier and tan in color. The Snake River, however, can be seen flowing across this drier area, with some areas of irrigation nearby.

The Pacific coastline and some areas of higher elevations are flanked or dotted, respectively, by clouds. Also visible in the lower left quadrant are condensation trails – straight lines of clouds formed around the exhaust of airplanes.

Mount St. Helens in the Cascade Volcanic Arc, USA

May 12th, 2010 Category: Mountains, Volcanoes

USA - April 28th, 2010

USA - April 28th, 2010

Mount St. Helens is an active stratovolcano located in Skamania County, Washington, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, visible just below the center of this orthorectified image.

Mount St. Helens is most famous for its catastrophic eruption on May 18, 1980, at 8:32 am PDT which was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States.

The volcano is located in the Cascade Range and is part of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, a segment of the Pacific Ring of Fire that includes over 160 active volcanoes. This volcano is well known for its ash explosions and pyroclastic flows.

As with most other volcanoes in the Cascade Range, Mount St. Helens is a large eruptive cone consisting of lava rock interlayered with ash, pumice, and other deposits. The mountain includes layers of basalt and andesite through which several domes of dacite lava have erupted. The largest of the dacite domes formed the previous summit, and off its northern flank sat the smaller Goat Rocks dome. Both were destroyed in the 1980 eruption.

Mount Hood and Lake Bonneville, Western USA – May 9th, 2010

45.5N 121.5W

May 9th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Volcanoes

USA - April 28th, 2010

USA - April 28th, 2010

Mount Hood, standing out above the surrounding peaks of the Cascade Range in the lower right quadrant of this orthorectified image, is a stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc of northern Oregon. It is located about 50 miles (80 km) east-southeast of Portland, on the border between Clackamas and Hood River counties.

The exact height assigned to Mount Hood’s snow-covered peak has varied over its history. Modern sources point to different heights: 11,249 feet (3,429 m) based on the 1991 U.S. National Geodetic Survey and 11,240 feet (3,426 m) based on a 1993 scientific expedition. Regardless, it is the highest mountain in Oregon and the fourth-highest in the Cascade Range.

Visible to the north of the volcano is Lake Bonneville, a reservoir on the Columbia River shared by the U.S. states of Oregon (south) and Washington (north). It was created in 1937 with the construction of Bonneville Dam. The reservoir stretches between it and the Dalles Dam, upstream. It lies in parts of three counties in Oregon (Multnomah, Hood River, Wasco) and two in Washington (Skamania, Klickitat).

Seattle on the Shores of the Puget Sound, Washington State, USA

47.6N 122.3W

May 2nd, 2010 Category: Lakes

USA - April 28th, 2010

USA - April 28th, 2010

The city of Seattle (upper right quadrant) is visible on the shores of the Puget Sound, in this orthorectified image of the U.S. state of Washington. The sound is a complex estuarine system of interconnected marine waterways and basins.

It has one major and one minor connection to the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Pacific Ocean—Admiralty Inlet being the major connection and Deception Pass being the minor. Flow through Deception Pass accounts for about 2% of the total tidal exchange between Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

Puget Sound extends approximately 100 miles (160 km) from Deception Pass in the north to Olympia, Washington in the south. Its average depth is 205 feet (62 m) and its maximum depth, off Point Jefferson between Indianola and Kingston, is 930 feet (280 m).

The term “Puget Sound” is used not just for the body of water but also the general region centered on the sound, including the Seattle metropolitan area, home to about 4.2 million people.