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High Destructive Potential of Hurricane Sandy (18L), Eastern USA – October 29th, 2012

34.8N 77W

October 29th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Sandy (18L) – October 28th, 2012

Enhanced image

Track of Hurricane Sandy (18L) - October 28th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 18L

As of 5 p.m. EDT (2100 UTC) October 28, Hurricane Sandy is located within 20 nautical miles of 32.4°N 71.3°W, about 270 mi (435 km) east-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina and about 530 mi (850 km) south-southeast of New York City.

Maximum sustained winds are 65 knots (75 mph, 120 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 952 mbar (hPa; 28.11 InHg), and the system is moving northeast at 13 kt (15 mph, 24 km/h). Hurricane force winds extend up to 175 miles (280 km) from the center of Sandy, and tropical storm force winds up to 520 miles (835 km) from the center.

According to the Weather Channel, Hurricane Sandy appears destined to enter the history books as one of the most exceptional and potentially destructive storms to strike the Northeast in modern history.

Sandy, in terms of geographic size, is already the largest Atlantic hurricane of the past quarter-century. In a sign of how extraordinarily large Sandy is, a tropical storm warning is also in effect for Bermuda, while lakeshore flood warnings have been hoisted on parts of the Great Lakes including Chicago. The full extent of the storm is best observed in the full image.

Sandy has stayed close to the borderline between high-end tropical storm and low-end hurricane status, despite an impressively low central pressure. But despite the absence of sustained triple-digit winds, the huge breadth of Sandy’s circulation promises widespread disruption to life for tens of millions of Americans.

Sandy will produce its greatest impacts in the Northeast and the Mid-Atlantic Monday into Tuesday. A huge area of strong winds is blowing water toward the U.S. mainland. Already by Sunday evening, tides in some locations were 2 to 4 feet above normal from the Outer Banks of North Carolina north to eastern Long Island.

Sandy’s rain bands and gusty winds continue to expand across the Northeast. The heaviest rain was focused on the Mid-Atlantic as of late Sunday evening. Winds were gusting in excess of 40 mph in several locations along the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast coastline.

Numerous high wind warnings have been issued across the Northeast for Monday and Tuesday, along with a slew of flood watches and warnings both for storm-surge flooding at the coast and freshwater flooding from rainfall inland. Blizzard warnings have even been posted for the mountains of West Virginia. Tropical storm warnings are in effect for parts of the North Carolina coast. In addition, the National Hurricane Center is forecasting hurricane-force winds from the Maryland/Virginia border to Cape Cod.

Life-threatening storm surge flooding of over 10 feet will be possible in Long Island Sound, and surge up to 6 feet above ground level is expected for parts of coastal North Carolina if peak surge occurs at high tide. Many other East Coast locations can expect dangerous storm surge.

Bays and Cities Along USA’s East Coast

40.2N 74.7W

October 25th, 2012 Category: Sediments

USA – October 22nd, 2012

Several important cities and state capitals can be seen as grey areas along the east coast of the United States of America. From upper right to lower left we can observe New York City, Newark, Trenton, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, D.C. Sediments can be observed in Delaware Bay (between southern New Jersey and Delaware, near the image center), though fewer are visible in Chesapeake Bay (southwest of the former).

East Coast Cities and Appalachian Mountains, USA – March 14th, 2012

39.2N 76.6W

March 14th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Mountains

USA - March 11th, 2012

Multiple cities can be observed along the eastern coast of the United States of American in this image, appearing as grey areas (best observed upon opening the full image). From the upper right, moving southwestward near the shoreline, one can see Boston, Massachusetts; Providence, Rhode Island; New York City, New York; Trenton, New Jersey; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Baltimore, Maryland; and Washington, D.C.

Visible further east are the Appalachian Mountains. The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east-west travel as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to any road running east-west. These alternating ridgelines and valley appear as alternating lines of brown and green, respectively.

Massive Blizzard Dumps Snow Over Eastern USA

38.8N 77W

December 22nd, 2009 Category: Snapshots

USA - December 20th, 2009

USA - December 20th, 2009

A massive winter storm that dumped record amounts of snow in the east of the US is now slowly making its way toward the north-east, still shutting airports and closing roads. In Washington DC and New York airports have reopened and roads are being cleared, but authorities report it will be days before things return to normal.

The storm, which began with severe flooding and a tornado in Florida, has covered Washington DC, Philadelphia and New York with a blanket of snow smashing a 70-year-old records. The 33 centimetres of snow that fell in Washington, D.C., by late afternoon was the most ever recorded for a day in December.

The blizzard rocked the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast United States on Saturday, crippling travel across the region and causing hundreds of thousands of power outages. Five deaths appeared to have been caused by the storm system, which stretched from the Carolinas north to New England and spread into some Midwestern states.

Here, snow can be seen covering parts of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Washington D.C., Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky.

Forecasters said the storm system was expected to generate winds up to 55 km/h, which could cause near-whiteout conditions. Authorities in many areas asked drivers to stay off the roads if possible. The storm system, coming from the Gulf of Mexico and spreading out across much of the Atlantic coastline, was forecast to bring a mix of snow and freezing rain to North Carolina, Tennessee and parts of western and central Virginia.

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