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Posts tagged Wasatch Range

Mountains and Salt Flats Near Great Salt Lake, USA – June 27th, 2011

40.8N 109.2W

June 27th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Mountains, Salt Flats

USA - June 21st, 2011

Several mountain ranges, their peaks capped with snow, can be observed near the Great Salt Lake, in Utah, USA. An area of salt flats is also visible to the west of the lake.

To the north of the lake is the Wasatch Range, mountains that stretch through Utah and Idaho. To the east of the lake are the Uinta Mountains, a subrange of the Rocky Mountains, unusual because they run on a horizontal axis.

From Plains and Lakes to Mountains in Northwestern USA

43.4N 111.7W

October 25th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Mountains

USA - October 21st, 2010

The northern and southeastern portions of this image of the north- and central-western USA are mostly covered by flat plains, while the southwestern portions are dominated by various ridges of mountains.

Three lakes are visible in the upper half of the image (from left to right): the Fort Peck Reservoir in Montana, Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota and Lake Oahe in South Dakota.

A fourth lake can be observed near the mountains in the lower left corner: the Great Salt Lake in Utah. The white areas surrounding the lake, particularly to the southwest, are large expanses of salt flats.

Visible north of the Great Salt Lake is the Wasatch Range, a mountain range that stretches through Utah and Idaho. To the east of the lake, on a horizontal axis, are the Uinta Mountains, a subrange of the Rocky Mountains.

Mountains East of Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

40.8N 109.2W

July 16th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Mountains

USA - June 20th, 2010

USA - June 20th, 2010

The Great Salt Lake in Utah, USA, can be observed just left of the center.  The upper half of the lake appears brownish, while the lower half appears bluish green. This linear division of color is due to the Lucin Cutoff, a causeway crossing the lake that greatly limits the mixing of waters between the two halves.

Visible in the upper section of the image is part of the Wasatch Range, a mountain range that stretches about 160 miles (260 km) from the Utah-Idaho border, south through central Utah. The northern extension of the Wasatch Range, the Bear River Mountains, extends into Idaho from northern Utah after running east of the lake.

Also visible east of the lake, on a horizontal axis, are the snow-capped Uinta Mountains, a subrange of the Rocky Mountains. They are unusual for being the highest range in the contiguous United States running east to west.

The Wasatch Range, East of the Great Salt Lake, USA – December 26th, 2009

41.0N 112.4W

December 26th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

USA - December 1st, 2009

USA - December 1st, 2009

The Wasatch Range is a mountain range that stretches about 160 miles (260 km) from the Utah-Idaho border, south through central Utah in the western United States. It is generally considered the western edge of the greater Rocky Mountains, and the eastern edge of the Great Basin region.

The northern extension of the Wasatch Range, the Bear River Mountains, extends into Idaho from northern Utah after running east of the Great Salt Lake in this orthorectified image.

North of the Lucin Cutoff, a causeway crossing the lake that appears here as a white line, are a series of bays that extend towards the mountains. These bays of the Great Salt Lake include Bear River Bay, Willard Bay, North Bay and South Bay.

Great Salt Lake and Wasatch Range, Utah, USA

41.0N 112.4W

December 12th, 2009 Category: Lakes

USA - November 17th, 2009

USA - November 17th, 2009

One of Utah’s defining characteristics is the variety of its terrain.  Eastern Utah, in the lower right quadrant, is a high-elevation area covered mostly by plateaus and basins. Running down the northern center of the state is the Wasatch Range, which rises to heights of about 12,000 feet (3,650 m) above sea level. Portions of these mountains receive more than 500 inches (12.7 m) of snow each year.

The Great Salt Lake and Great Salt Lake Desert can be seen west of these mountains. The southern half of the lake appears greener than the northern half due to a causeway, the Lucin Cutoff, which greatly restricts the flow of water between the two sections.