Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Wadden Sea Islands

Hamburg and Jutland Peninsula, Germany and Denmark – February 13th, 2012

53.5N 9.9E

February 13th, 2012 Category: Image of the day

Denmark - February 10th, 2012

This wide-swath ASAR image shows the Jutland Peninsula, a peninsula in Europe, divided between Denmark and Germany. The Danish portion has an area of 29,775 km2 (11,496 sq mi) and a population of 2,513,601 (2007). Population density is 84 per km² (218 per sq.mi.). Its terrain is relatively flat, with heaths, plains and peat bogs in the west and a more elevated and slightly hilly terrain in the east.

The northernmost part of Jutland is separated by the Limfjord from the mainland, but is still commonly considered as part of the peninsula. It only became an island following a flood in 1825. The Danish Wadden Sea Islands and the German North Frisian Islands stretch along the southwest coast of Jutland in the German Bight.

Visible at the center of the bottom edge is Hamburg, located on the southern point of the Jutland Peninsula, directly between Continental Europe to its south, Scandinavia to its north, the North Sea to its west, and the Baltic Sea to its east. It is the second-largest city in Germany and the seventh-largest city in the European Union. The city is home to over 1.8 million people, while the Hamburg Metropolitan Region has more than 4.3 million inhabitants. Situated on the river Elbe, the port of Hamburg is the third-largest port in Europe (after the Port of Rotterdam and the Port of Antwerp) and it is among the twenty largest in the world.

Islands East and West of the Jutland Peninsula, Denmark and Germany

55.2N 8.5E

May 4th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Denmark and Germany - May 2nd, 2011

There are about 406 islands in Denmark, not including the Faroe Islands or Greenland. Some 70 of them are populated but the remainder are uninhabited. The largest islands include Funen (left) and Zealand (right), visible to the east of the Jutland peninsula.

Many other islands can be observed by the Germany-Denmark border on the west side of the peninsula. These are the Frisian Islands, also known as the Wadden Sea Islands.

The islands shield the mudflat region of the Wadden Sea (large parts of which fall dry during low tide) from the North Sea. Here, muddy tan sediments can be seen between the peninsula’s coast and the islands, and pour outwards from the mouth of the Elbe River in Germany.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

October 2019
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

41


Take Action

Widgets