Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Volcano

Volcanic Eruption in Chile – January 21st, 2013

40.6S 72.5W

January 21st, 2013 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Chile – January 20th, 2013

A cloud of what appears to be ash from a volcanic eruption blows westward over Chile, towards the Pacific Ocean. The ash appears to be emanating from one of the four different volcanoes that constitute the volcanic group known as the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex: the Cordillera Nevada caldera, the Pliocene Mencheca volcano, Cordón Caulle fissure vents and the Puyehue stratovolcano. However, reports of volcanic activity in Chile indicate that activity is currently limited to the Copahue and Villarrica volcanoes, meaning that the cloud in this image may be the result of other phenomena, such as wildfires.

Emission of Steam or Sulphurous Gas from Ambrym Island, Vanuatu

16.2S 168.1E

December 23rd, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Vanuatu – December 11th, 2012

Ambrym Island is a volcanic island in the archipelago of Vanuatu (formerly known as the New Hebrides).  Located near the center of the long Vanuatuan archipelago (here, the second large island from the bottom in the row of islands lined up parallel to the right edge), Ambryn is roughly triangular in shape, about 50 km (31 mi) wide.

The island is well known for its highly active volcanic activity. Here, although it is mostly covered by clouds, a plume of steam or sulfurous gas can be seen blowing northward from it. Such plumes are frequently emitted by Ambrym’s active lava lakes within its caldera.

Ash and Steam Released from Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano

40.5S 72.1W

March 16th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Chile and Argentina - March 7th, 2012

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano could be seen releasing ash and steam at the end of the first week of March, 2012. The Chilean National Service of Geology and Mining reported that the plume was 1.2 kilometers (3,900 feet) high, and extended 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the active vent.

Other effects of the eruption can also be observed. Immediately to the east of the volcanic complex is a dark brown area, thick with fallen ash fall that has killed much of the vegetation. Further east are several bright turquoise lakes whose milky color is caused by fine ash suspended in the water. Some lakes show evidence of floating ash and pumice.

Mount Etna Erupts for Third Time in 2012, Italy – March 5th, 2012

37.7N 14.9E

March 5th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Mount Etna - March 4th, 2012

Visible by the left edge of this image is Mount Etna, in Sicily, Italy. A white cloud of ash and steam can be seen spewing forth from the volcano, which is already erupting for the third time in 2012. Mount Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is in an almost constant state of activity.

Mount Etna is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania. It is the tallest active volcano in Europe, currently standing 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions; the mountain is 21 m (69 ft) higher than it was in 1981. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km² (460 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km, making it by far the largest of the three active volcanoes in Italy.

Volcanic Ash and Steam Released from Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Once Again – December 29th, 2011

40.6S 72.5W

December 29th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Argentina and Chile - December 24th, 2011

Volcanic ash and steam pour through a fissure of Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano that opened several months earlier. The active fissure lies northwest of the Puyehue caldera, and a plume blows from the fissure westwards to the coast, then northwestwards over the Pacific Ocean.

Chile’s Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería has characterized the recent activity as a minor eruption of low intensity. Puyehue-Cordón Caulle is a stratovolcano, a steep-sloped, conical volcano composed of layers of ash, lava, and rocks released by previous eruptions. The volcano is 2,236 meters (7,336 feet) high.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

September 2018
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

37


Take Action

Widgets