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Posts tagged Victoria Nile

Sediments in Southern, Swampy Section of Lake Albert, Uganda and DRC

1.7N 30.9E

January 4th, 2012 Category: Lakes

Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo - December 25th, 2011

Lake Albert – also Albert Nyanza and formerly Lake Mobutu Sese Seko – is one of the African Great Lakes. It is Africa’s seventh-largest lake, and the world’s twenty-seventh largest lake by volume. Lake Albert is located in the center of the continent, on the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Lake Albert is the northernmost of the chain of lakes in the Albertine Rift, the western branch of the East African Rift. It is about 160 km (100 mi) long and 30 km (19 mi) wide, with a maximum depth of 51 m (168 ft), and a surface elevation of 619 m (2,030 ft) above sea level.

Lake Albert is part of the complicated system of the upper Nile. Its main sources are the Victoria Nile, ultimately coming from Lake Victoria to the southeast, and the Semliki River, which issues from Lake Edward to the southwest. The water of the Victoria Nile is much less saline than that of Lake Albert. Its outlet, at the northernmost tip of the lake, is the Albert Nile (which becomes known as the Mountain Nile when it enters South Sudan).

At the southern end of the lake, where the Semliki comes in, there are swamps. Here, sediments can be seen tinging the waters in this section of the lake. Farther south loom the mighty Ruwenzori Range, while a range of hills called the Blue Mountains tower over the northwestern shore. The few settlements along the shore include Butiaba and Pakwach.

Lakes Turkana and Kyoga and Mount Elgon, Uganda and Kenya – December 31st, 2011

3.6N 36.0E

December 31st, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Volcanoes

Uganda and Kenya - December 29th, 2011

The image focuses on Lake Turkana, formerly known as Lake Rudolf, is a lake in the Great Rift Valley in Kenya, with its far northern end crossing into Ethiopia. Here, sediments and algal growth turn the lake’s color from tan in the north to green and then a dark, bluish green in the south.

It is the world’s largest permanent desert lake and the world’s largest alkaline lake. The rocks of the surrounding area are predominantly volcanic. Central Island is an active volcano, emitting vapors. Outcrops and rocky shores are found on the East and South shores of the lake, while dunes, spits and flats are on the West and North, at a lower elevation.

Visible at the bottom edge of the image are Lake Kyoga, a large shallow lake complex of Uganda, and Mount Elgon, an extinct shield volcano on the border of Uganda and Kenya. It is the oldest and largest solitary volcano in East Africa, covering an area of around 3500 km². Lake Kyoga has an area of about 1,720 km2. The Victoria Nile flows through the lake on its way from Lake Victoria to Lake Albert.

Lake Albert, Straddling the Border Between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – March 31st, 2009

March 31st, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Uganda - March 24th, 2009

Uganda - March 24th, 2009

Lake Albert, one of the Great Lakes of Africa, is located in the center of the continent, on the border between Uganda (left) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (right). It is Africa’s seventh largest lake, and ranks as the world’s twenty-seventh largest lake by volume.

Lake Albert is the northernmost of the chain of lakes in the Great Rift Valley; it is about 160 km (100 mi) long and 30 km (19 mi) wide, with a maximum depth of 51 m (168 ft), and a surface elevation of 619 m (2,030 ft) above sea level.

Lake Albert is part of the complicated system of the upper Nile. Its main sources are the Victoria Nile, ultimately coming from Lake Victoria to the southeast, and the Semliki River, which issues from Lake Edward to the southwest. Here, the Semliki is spilling greenish sediments into the lake at the southern end.

The water of the Victoria Nile is much less saline than that of Lake Albert. Its outlet, at the northernmost tip of the lake, is the Albert Nile (which becomes known as the Mountain Nile when it enters Sudan).

At the southern end of the lake, where the Semliki enters, there are swamps. Farther south loom the mighty Ruwenzori Range, while a range of hills called the Blue Mountains tower over the northwestern shore.

Lake Kyoga, Uganda

January 26th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Lake Kyoga, Uganda - January 16th, 2009

Lake Kyoga, Uganda - January 16th, 2009

Lake Kyoga is a large shallow lake complex of Uganda, north of Lake Victoria, about 1,720 km² in area and at an elevation of 914 m.

The Victoria Nile flows through the lake on its way from Lake Victoria to Lake Albert. The main inflow from Lake Victoria is regulated by the Nalubaale Power Station in Jinja.

Another source of water is the Mount Elgon region on the border between Uganda and Kenya.

While Lake Kyoga is part of Great Lakes system, it is not itself considered a Great Lake.  Extensive wetlands fed by a complex system of streams and rivers surround the lake.

The lake complex reaches a maximum depth at about 5.7 meters, and most of it is less than 4 m in depth. Areas less than 3 m deep are completely covered by water lilies, which may contribute to the green tint of the lake as seen here.

Much of the swampy shoreline is covered with papyrus and water hyacinth. The papyrus also forms floating islands that drift between a number of small permanent islands.

Excessive El Niño rains in 1997-1998 resulted in exceptionally high water levels, causing large islands of papyrus and water hyacinth mats to become dislodged on the lake and to accumulate at the lake’s outlet into the Victoria Nile.

This blockage caused the water level to become even higher, flooding about 580 km² of the surrounding land and resulting in population displacement and severe socioeconomic damage.

source Wikipedia

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