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Posts tagged Venetian Lagoon

Wetlands of the Venetian Lagoon and Po Delta, Italy

45.4N 12.3E

May 30th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers, Sediments

Italy - April 28th, 2010

Italy - April 28th, 2010

The Venetian Lagoon (center left) appears green in this image of northern Italy. The lagoon is the enclosed bay of the Adriatic Sea in which the city of Venice is situated. It is the largest wetland in the Mediterranean Basin.

The lagoon stretches from the River Sile in the north to the Brenta in the south, with a surface area of around 550 km². It is around 8% land, including Venice itself and many smaller islands. About 11% is permanently covered by open water, or canal, as the network of dredged channels are called, while around 80% consists of mud flats, tidal shallows and salt marshes.

Another important area of wetlands is visible to the south: the delta of the River Po. Much of the delta is a protected park, with 53,653 ha (132,580 acres) containing wetlands, forest, dunes and salt pans. It has a high biodiversity, with 1000-1100 plant species and 374 vertebrate species, of which 300 are birds.

The Venetian Lagoon, Italy

45.4N 12.3E

February 3rd, 2010 Category: Snapshots

Italy - December 16th, 2009

Italy - December 16th, 2009

The Venetian Lagoon, along the coast in the lower half of this  orthorectified image, is the enclosed bay of the Adriatic Sea in which the city of Venice is situated. The lagoon is the largest wetland in the Mediterranean Basin.

The Venetian Lagoon stretches from the River Sile in the north to the Brenta in the south, with a surface area of around 550 km². It is around 8% land, including Venice itself and many smaller islands. About 11% is permanently covered by open water, or canal, as the network of dredged channels are called, while around 80% consists of mud flats, tidal shallows and salt marshes.

It is connected to the Adriatic Sea by three inlets: the Lido, Malamocco and Chioggia inlets. Sited at the end of a largely enclosed sea, the lagoon is subject to high variations in water level, the most extreme being the spring tides known as the acqua alta (Italian for “high waters”), which regularly flood much of Venice.

Geography of Italy’s Veneto Region – December 30th, 2009

45.4N 12.3E

December 30th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Snapshots

Italy - November 30th, 2009

Italy - November 30th, 2009

Veneto is the eighth largest region in Italy, with a total area of 18,398.9 km2 (7,103.9 sq mi). It is located in the north-eastern part of Italy and is bordered by four other Italian regions and Austria. The north-south extension of Veneto is 210 km (130 mi) from the Austrian border to the mouth of the Po and its east-west extension is 195 km (121 mi) from the eastern shore of Lake Garda on the west to the mouth of the River Tagliamento on the east.

Veneto can be divided into four areas, parts of which are all visible in this orthorectified image: the northern Alpine zone, the hill zone, the lower plain and the coastal territory. Twenty-nine% of its surface is mountainous (Carnic Alps, eastern Dolomites and Venetian Prealps). The best known massif in the Dolomites is the Marmolada, while the highest, at 3,342 m (10,960 ft), is the Tofane-massif. The Venetian Prealps are not as high and range between 700 m (2,300 ft) and 2,200 m (7,200 ft).

Fifty-seven% of the Veneto region is covered by the Po Valley, a plain extending from the mountains to the Adriatic Sea, broken only by some low hills: Colli Berici, Colli Euganei, Colli Asolani and Montello, which constitute the remaining 14% of the territory. The Venetian plain itself is subdivided into the higher plain (gravel-strewn and not very fertile) and the lower plain (rich in water sources and arable terrain). The lower plain is both a mainstay of agricultural production and the most populated part of the region.

Several rivers traverse the region: the Po, Adige, Brenta, Bacchiglione, Livenza, Piave, and Tagliamento. The eastern shore of the largest lake in Italy, Lake Garda, belongs to Veneto. The coastline covers approximately 200 km (120 mi), of which 100 km (62 mi) are beaches. The coasts of the Adriatic Sea are characterized by the Venetian Lagoon,  visible near the shores on the right, a flat terrain with ponds, marshes and islands. The Po Delta to the south features sandbars and dunes along the coastline. The inland portion contains cultivable land recently reclaimed by a system of canals and dikes.  The delta is a stopping-point for migratory birds.

The Cities of Venice and Mestre, South of the Piave River in Northern Italy

45.4N 12.3E

November 11th, 2009 Category: Rivers

Italy - October 7th, 2009

Italy - October 7th, 2009

The city of Venice, capital of the Veneto Region is northern Italy, appears as a fish-shaped white island in the Venetian Lagoon along the Adriatic Sea. The city actually stretches across 118 small islands in the marshy lagoon.Visible on the Italian mainland across from the island is the city of Mestre.

The saltwater lagoon itself stretches along the shoreline between the mouths of the Po and the Piave Rivers. Here, the Piave can be seen flowing towards the Adriatic north of the lagoon. It begins in the Alps and flows southeast for 220 km (135 miles) into the sea.

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