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Posts tagged Timor

Environmental Threats to Lesser Sunda Islands

8.6S 121.0E

May 22nd, 2012 Category: Snapshots

Indonesia - May 20th, 2012

This image shows several of the Lesser Sunda Islands, a group of islands in the southern Maritime Southeast Asia, north of Australia. The three largest islands visible here are Sumba, Flores and Timor (lower half of image, from left to right). The islands are part of a volcanic arc, the Sunda Arc, formed by subduction along the Java Trench in the Java Sea.

Although most of the vegetation on these islands is dry forest there are patches of rainforest on these islands too, especially in lowland areas and along riverbanks. However, the ecosystem is threatened: more than half of the original vegetation of the islands has been cleared for planting of rice and other crops, for settlement and by consequent forest fires.

While many ecological problems affect both small islands and large landmasses, small islands suffer their particular problems and are highly exposed to external forces. Development pressures on small islands are increasing, although their effects are not always anticipated. Although Indonesia is richly endowed with natural resources, the resources of the small islands of Nusa Tenggara are limited and specialised; furthermore human resources in particular are limited.

Sediments in King Sound and Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, Australia

14.8S 125.6E

September 15th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Australia - September 8th, 2011

Sediments can be observed in two large gulfs along the coast of northwestern Australia: King Sound, a large gulf that expands from the mouth of the Fitzroy River (lower left quadrant), and the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, which receives sediments from the Ord and Victoria Rivers (right of center).

In the upper left quadrant, the island of Timor, at the southern end of Maritime Southeast Asia, can be observed. The island is divided between the independent state of East Timor, and West Timor, belonging to the Indonesian province of East Nusa Tenggara.

Timor, Across the Sea from Northwestern Australia

10.6S 124.7E

September 9th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Australia - September 5th, 2011

Sediments line the coast of northwestern Australia, giving a green tinge to the waters along the shoreline. Visible across the sea is Timor, an island at the southern end of Maritime Southeast Asia, north of the Timor Sea.

It is divided between the independent state of East Timor, and West Timor, belonging to the Indonesian province of East Nusa Tenggara. The island’s surface is 30,777 square kilometres.

Timor is located north of Australia, and is one of the easternmost Sunda Islands. Together with Sumba, Babar and associated smaller islands, Timor forms the southern outer archipelago of the Lesser Sunda Islands with the inner islands of Flores, Alor and Wetar to the north, and beyond them Sulawesi.

 

Sediments in King Sound, Australia, and Lesser Sunda Islands

9.8S 124.3E

September 1st, 2010 Category: Rivers, Sediments

Australia - August 30th, 2010

Sediments spilling out of the mouth of the Fitzroy River turn King Sound tan in color. The rest of the coastline of Western Australia visible to the northeast of the sound is also framed by sediments, although these appear less dense and greenish in color.

Several islands can be observed to the north. Most belong to the Indonesian province of East Nusa Tenggara, located in the eastern portion of the Lesser Sunda Islands, including West Timor. The provincial capital is Kupang, located on West Timor. The highest point is Mount Mutis of Timor Tengah Selatan, which is 2427 meters above sea level.

The province consists of about 550 islands, but is dominated by the three main islands of Flores, Sumba, and West Timor, the western half of the island of Timor. The eastern part of Timor is the independent country of East Timor. Other islands include Adonara, Alor, Komodo, Lembata, Menipo, Raijua, Rincah, Rote Island (the southernmost island in Indonesia), Savu, Semau, and Solor.

Timor and Nearby Islands in Maritime Southeast Asia

9.8S 124.3E

November 23rd, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Timor-Leste - September 24th, 2009

Timor-Leste - September 24th, 2009

Timor is an island at the southern end of Maritime Southeast Asia, north of the Timor Sea. The largest island in this image, it is divided between the independent state of East Timor (or Timor-Leste), and West Timor, belonging to the Indonesian province of East Nusa Tenggara.

The island’s surface is 11,883 square miles (30,777 km²). The name is a variant of timur, Malay for “east”; it is so called because it is at the east end of a chain of islands. The closest of these islands belong to the Alor Archipelago (due north of West Timor), which in turn is part of the Lesser Sunda Islands.

Visible below the southwestern tip of Timor is the island of Rote, while the island above the northeastern end is called Wetar, part of the Barat Daya Islands, including Wetar.

Timor has older geology and lacks the volcanic nature of the northern Lesser Sunda Islands. The orientation of the main axis of the island also differs from its neighbors. These features have been explained as the result of being on the northern edge of the Indo-Australian Plate as it pushes into Southeast Asia.

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