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Posts tagged Timor Sea

Tropical Cyclone Narelle (08S) Affecting Western Australia

21.5S 111.0E

January 14th, 2013 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm 08S – January 13th, 2013

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Track of Tropical Storm 08S - January 13th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 08S

Tropical Cyclone Narelle (08S) began as a weak tropical low that formed within the Timor Sea about 160 km (100 mi) to the southeast of Dili in Timor-Leste. Two days later TCWC Perth commenced regular bulletins under the designation 05U.

The system reached category one tropical cyclone status on 8 January and subsequently was named Narelle. As of 12 January, Narelle was a category 5 severe cyclone, with a cyclone warning between Roebourne and Coral Bay, and a cyclone watch between Coral Bay and Carnarvon. On 12 January, people living in Mardie, Onslow, Exmouth and Coral Bay were told to prepare for the storm.

Area of Convection Off Australia Coast Has High Probability of Becoming Tropical Cyclone

13.6S 118.3E

January 7th, 2013 Category: Tropical Storms

Area of Convection – January 6th, 2013

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Track of Area of Convection - January 6th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Area of Convection

The formation of a significant tropical cyclone is possible in the Timor Sea, off the coast of Australia, within 120 nm either side of a line from 11.1S 121.5E to 13.4S 118.2E within the next 12 to 24 hours.

Winds in the area are estimated to be 25 to 30 knots. METSAT imagery indicates that a circulation center is located near 11.4S 120.9E. The system is moving westward at 09 knots.

The area of convection previously located near 11.0S 123.5E  (click here for previous images) is now located near 11.4S 120.9E, approximately 590 nm west of Darwin, Australia. Recent multispectral and enhanced infrared satellite imagery shows a consolidation of convection, with fragmented bands wrapping around a low level circulation center (LLCC).

Upper level analysis indicates this area is approximately five degrees north of an anticyclone, providing good outflow and low (10 knots) vertical wind shear. Additionally, as the system moves southward, strong gradient-induced upper level winds moving into the southwestern region of Australia should further enhance the outflow over the next 24 hours.

Sea surface temperatures are a very favorable 30-31 degrees celsius. Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 25 to 30 knots. Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 1001 mb. Due to increased consolidation of the LLCC, the potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours is high.

Tropical Low Off Coast of Australia

14.1S 122.5E

January 7th, 2013 Category: Tropical Storms

Area of Convection – January 6th, 2013

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Track of Area of Convection - January 6th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Area of Convection

On 5 January, TCWC Darwin reported that a weak tropical low had formed within the Timor Sea about 160 km (100 mi) to the southeast of Dili in Timor-leste. The low has a medium chance of becoming a tropical cyclone and is being closely monitored.

Smoky Haze over Western Australia and Northern Territory, Australia

14S 132.0E

September 24th, 2012 Category: Fires

Australia – September 3rd, 2012

A grey, smoky haze hangs over the border area of Western Australia and the Northern Territory, and extends northwestward over the Timor Sea (upper left quadrant). In the full image, many individual fires can be discerned, particularly near the coastline of the Van Diemen Gulf (above, center) and the Gulf of Carpentaria (right).

Fire Near Coast of the Kimberley, Australia

14.6S 125.6E

September 19th, 2012 Category: Fires

Australia – September 3rd, 2012

Smoke hovers over the Kimberley, one of the nine regions of Western Australia. It is in the northern part of Western Australia, bordered on the west by the Indian Ocean, on the north by the Timor Sea, on the south by the Great Sandy and Tanami Deserts, and on the east by the Northern Territory. A large fire can be observed near the coast in the upper right quadrant, releasing a thick plume of smoke.

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