Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Taupo Volcanic Zone

Volcanoes and Lakes on New Zealand’s North Island

March 15th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Volcanoes

North Island, New Zealand - March 11th, 2009

North Island, New Zealand - March 11th, 2009

Close-up

Close-up

The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand.

The island is 113,729 square km in area, making it the world’s 14th-largest island, with a population of 3,250,700 (June 2008 estimate). Approximately 76% of New Zealand’s population lives on the North Island.

The snow-capped peak is Mount Ruapehu, an active stratovolcano at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone.

Two lakes are visible north of the volcano: Lake Taupo (middle) and Lake Rotorua (top). The latter lies in the Rotorua Caldera, one of several large volcanoes located in the Taupo Volcanic Zone.

Its last major eruption was about 240,000 years ago, after which the magma chamber underneath the volcano collapsed. The circular depression left behind is the current caldera, about 22 km (14 miles) in diameter and now occupied by Lake Rotorua. Mokoia Island, close to the centre of the lake, is a rhyolite dome.

Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand – February 7th, 2009

February 7th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

North Island, New Zealand - January 31st, 2009

North Island, New Zealand - January 31st, 2009

Mount Ruapehu is an active stratovolcano at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand’s North Island. It is visible, capped with snow, among the clouds in the lower left quadrant.

Ruapehu is 23 kilometres northeast of Ohakune and 40 kilometres southwest of the southern shore of Lake Taupo, within Tongariro National Park.

It is one of the world’s most active volcanoes and the largest active volcano in New Zealand.

It is the highest point in the North Island and includes three major peaks: Tahurangi (2,797 m), Te Heuheu (2,755 m) and Paretetaitonga (2,751 m).

The North Island’s major skifields and only glaciers are on its slopes.

The deep, active crater is between the peaks and fills with a crater lake between major eruptions.

source Wikipedia