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Posts tagged Tasmania

Hobart on Derwent River Estuary by Meehan Ranges, Tasmania, Australia

42.8S 147.3E

August 26th, 2010 Category: Mountains, Rivers

Australia - July 11th, 2010

Australia - July 11th, 2010

This APM image of eastern Tasmania, Australia, shows the area around the city of Hobart (yellow-white area near center of ledge edge). Hobart is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian island state of Tasmania.

The city is located in the state’s south-east on the estuary of the Derwent River. It extends along both sides of the Derwent River, on the Western Shore from the Derwent Valley in the North through the flatter areas of Glenorchy and into the hilly areas of New Town, Lenah Valley, before stretching into the lower areas such as the beaches of Sandy Bay in the South, in the Derwent Estuary.

The Eastern Shore also extends from the Derwent Valley area in a Southerly direction hugging the Meehan Ranges in the East before sprawling into flatter land in suburbs such as Bellerive. From there the city extends in an easterly direction through the Meehan Ranges into the hilly areas of Rokeby and Oakdowns, before reaching into the tidal flatland area of Lauderdale. The skyline of Hobart is dominated by Mount Wellington at 1,271 metres high.

Moulting Lagoon Near Great Oyster Bay, Australia

42.2S 148.3E

August 5th, 2010 Category: Lakes

Australia - July 11th, 2010

Australia - July 11th, 2010

This APM image shows the eastern coast of Tasmania, Australia. Visible in the lower right quadrant is the Freycinet Peninsula, lying 1.6 kilometers north of Schouten Island.

West of the peninsula is Great Oyster Bay, a broad and sheltered bay that opens onto the Tasman Sea. At the north of the bay the floodplains of the Aspley and Swan rivers has created the Moulting Lagoon, an important Ramsar listed wetlands, known as the Moulting Lagoon Game Reserve.

National Parks and State Forest Reserves in Australia

37.3S 146.8E

March 24th, 2010 Category: Snapshots

Australia - February 23rd, 2010

Australia - February 23rd, 2010

Parts of Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia, can all be observed here. While mainland Australia’s more arid interior appears reddish, many green and brown forested areas are visible closer to the coast.

Many of the dark green areas are national parks and state forest reserves, including Alpine National Park, Snowy River National Park and Errinunda National Park in Victoria, as well as Kosciuszko National Park, Namadgi National Park, Bondo State Forest and Brindabella National Park in New South Wales

Fire by Victoria-NSW Border Releases Circular Smoke Cloud, Australia – March 17th, 2010

37.5S 149.5E

March 17th, 2010 Category: Fires, Image of the day, Phytoplankton

Australia - March 14th, 2010

Australia - March 14th, 2010

Close-up of Fire by Victoria-NSW Border

Close-up of Fire by Victoria-NSW Border

Close-up of Smoke Over Bass Strait

Close-up of Smoke Over Bass Strait

Smoke from fires near the southern coast of Victoria, Australia, trails over the Bass Strait towards Tanzania. They appear to be located mostly in national parks or forest reserve areas.

The most prominent fire is located to the upper right,  by the Victoria-New South Wales (NWS) border. It is releasing a large, circular cloud of smoke. Also, to the south, a green and blue phytoplankton bloom is visible in the Bass Strait below the veil of smoke.

Vegetation Index of Tasmania, Victoria and New South Wales, Australia

37.8S 144.9E

March 4th, 2010 Category: Vegetation Index

Australia - February 23rd, 2010

Australia - February 23rd, 2010

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia. Most of Tasmania appears green, indicating good levels of photosynthetic activity, as do most of the coastal areas on the Australian mainland.

Some areas in New South Wales, principally in national parks and forest reserves, appear dark red, indicating high photosynthetic activity. As one moves inland towards Australia’s more arid interior, the color changes to yellow and white, reflecting the low activity of those zones.