Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Taman Peninsula

Greater Caucasus Range Between Russia and Georgia – May 27th, 2010

42.9N 40.7E

May 27th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Mountains

Russia and Georgia - April 28th, 2010

Russia and Georgia - April 28th, 2010

The Caucasus is a mountainous region, between the Black Sea (visible in the lower part of the image) and Caspian Sea. Occupying roughly 170,000 sq mi (440,000 sq km), it is divided among Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia and forms part of the traditional dividing line between Europe and Asia.

It is bisected by the Caucasus Mountains; the area north of the Greater Caucasus range is called Ciscaucasia and the region to the south Transcaucasia. Here, part of the Greater Caucasus Range by the border of Russia (above) and Georgia (below) can be observed.

The Greater Caucasus is a major range of the Caucasus Mountains, extending west-east for about 750 miles (1,200 km) from the Taman Peninsula on the Black Sea to the Ab┼čeron Peninsula on the Caspian Sea.

Green Sediments by the Kerch Strait, Ukraine and Russia – May 23rd, 2010

45.3N 36.6E

May 23rd, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Sediments

Black Sea - April 28th, 2010

Black Sea - April 28th, 2010

The Kerch Strait connects the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov, separating the Kerch Peninsula in the west from the Taman Peninsula in the east. The strait is 4.5 kilometres (2.8 mi) to 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) wide and up to 18 metres (59 ft) deep.

The most important harbor is the Crimean city of Kerch (Ukraine) which gives its name to the strait, formerly known as the Cimmerian Bosporus.

The Russian side of the strait contains the Taman Bay encircled by the Tuzla Spit to the south and Chushka Spit to the north. The most important settlement on the Russian side is Taman where an important cargo port is under construction.

The Kerch Strait

January 11th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

The Kerch Strait - December 15th, 2008

The Kerch Strait - December 15th, 2008

The Kerch Strait connects the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. It separates the Kerch Peninsula in eastern Crimea from the Taman peninsula in western Russia.

The strait is 4.5 to 15 km (3-11 mi) wide and up to 18 meters deep. The most important harbor is the city of Kerch, in Crimea.

An algal bloom can be seen along both the Russian and Crimean shorelines. Some of the lakes just inland on the Russian side also appear very green with algae.

The brown area along the Russian shoreline is swampland or wetlands, not used for agriculture unlike much of the surrounding area.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

September 2019
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

37


Take Action

Widgets