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Posts tagged Tablazo Strait

Maracaibo on Tablazo Strait Near Gulf of Venezuela

10.6N 71.6W

December 30th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Venezuela - December 24th, 2011

Lake Maracaibo (below) is a large brackish bay in Venezuela. It is connected to the Gulf of Venezuela by Tablazo Strait (55km) at the northern end, and fed by numerous rivers, the largest being the Catatumbo. It is commonly considered a lake rather than a bay or lagoon, and at 13,210 km² it would be the largest lake in South America.

While the lake appears mostly sediment-free, tan and green sediments can be seen in the Gulf of Venezuela to the north. It is a gulf of the Caribbean Sea bounded by the Venezuelan states of Zulia and Falcón and by Guajira Department, Colombia. Also of note in the image is the city of Maracaibo, visible as a grey area on the western bank of the Tablazo Strait.

Sediments in Gulf of Venezuela and Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela – June 24th, 2011

9.5N 71.3W

June 24th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Venezuela - June 21st, 2011

Sediments give the Gulf of Venezuela a greenish hue. Those near the Guajira Peninsula (left) are lighter in color than those entering the gulf from Lake Maracaibo (bottom).

The sediments and algae in the Lake Maracaibo, actually a large, brackish bay, are dark green. It is connected to the Gulf of Venezuela by Tablazo Strait (55km) at the northern end, and fed by numerous rivers, the largest being the Catatumbo.

 

Gulf of Venezuela Between Guajira and Paraguaná Peninsulas – December 25th, 2009

10.6N 71.6W

December 25th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Venezuela - December 16th, 2009

Venezuela - December 16th, 2009

Sediments in the Gulf of Venezuela appear greenish by the Guajira Peninsula, on the west side of the gulf, and brown below the Paraguaná Peninsula, on the east side. The gulf is connected to Lake Maracaibo, in Venezuela to the south, by the 54 km Tablazo Strait. Beneath the partial cloud cover the lake appears greyish blue.

The Paraguaná Peninsula is a peninsula in Venezuela, situated in the north of Falcón state. The island of Aruba lies 27 km to the north. Bonaire and Curaçao are slightly further away. The Paraguaná Peninsula is connected to the rest of the state by a natural isthmus of Médanos.

The Guajira Peninsula, on the other hand, is shared by Colombia and Venezuela. It is the northernmost peninsula in South America and has an area of 25,000 km² (5500 square miles) extending from the Manaure Bay (Colombia) to the Calabozo Ensenada in the Gulf of Venezuela (Venezuela), and from the Caribbean Sea to the Serrania del Perija mountains range. The part of the peninsula furthest to the north is called Punta Gallinas; it is also considered the northernmost part of mainland South America.

The Gulf of Venezuela and Lake Maracaibo – November 4th, 2009

9.4N 71.4W

November 4th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Venezuela and Colombia - September 30th, 2009

Venezuela and Colombia - September 30th, 2009

Sediments in the Gulf of Venezuela (top center) leave thick light brown sediments by the Paraguaná Peninsula on the east side of the gulf, and greenish sediments on the west side by the Guajira Peninsula.

The Gulf, also known as the Gulf of Coquivacoa, by the Venezuelan states of Zulia and Falcón and the Colombian department (state) of Guajira.

It is connected to Lake Maracaibo, in Venezuela to the south, by the 54 km Tablazo Strait. The lake, appearing silvery here due to sun glint, is large and brackish. It is fed by numerous rivers, the largest being the Catatumbo.

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