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Posts tagged Sweden

Bothnian Bay Between Finland and Sweden

65.0N 22.1E

February 20th, 2012 Category: Snapshots

Sweden and Finland - December 29th, 2011

This orthorectified wide-swath ASAR image shows the Bothnian Bay or Bay of Bothnia (Swedish: Bottenviken, Finnish: Perämeri), the northernmost part of the Gulf of Bothnia. Its northernmost point is situated in Töre. The bay is bounded by Finland to the east, Sweden to the west, and the Kvarken sound to the south. The maximum depth of the bay is 482 feet (147 m). The bay has the highest rate of rising of land by post-glacial rebound in the Baltic Sea.

The Gulf of Bothnia (Finnish: Pohjanlahti; Swedish: Bottniska viken) is the northernmost arm of the Baltic Sea. It is situated between Finland’s west coast and Sweden’s east coast. The gulf is 725 km (450 mi) long, 80–240 km (50-150 mi) wide and has an average depth of 60 m (200 ft, 33 fathoms). The maximum depth is 295 m (965 ft, 161 fathoms). The surface area is 117,000 km² (45,200 sq mi).

Stockholm on South-Central East Coast of Sweden – February 18th, 2012

59.3N 18.0E

February 18th, 2012 Category: Image of the day

Sweden - December 29th, 2011

This wide-swath ASAR image shows Stockholm, the capital and the largest city of Sweden, visible as a white area near the center. It constitutes the most populated urban area in Scandinavia, with a population of 851,155 in the municipality (2010), 1.37 million in the urban area (2010), and around 2.1 million in the 6,519 km2 (2,517.00 sq mi) metropolitan area (2010). As of 2010, the Stockholm metropolitan area is home to approximately 22% of Sweden’s population.

Stockholm is located on Sweden’s south-central east coast, where Lake Mälaren meets the Baltic Sea. The central parts of the city consist of fourteen islands that are continuous with the Stockholm archipelago. The geographical city centre is situated on the water, in Riddarfjärden Bay. Over 30% of the city area is made up of waterways and another 30% is made up of parks and green spaces.

Islands by East and West Coasts of Denmark

55.5N 9.2E

October 18th, 2011 Category: Snapshots

Denmark - October 13th, 2011

This wide-swath ASAR image focuses on the Jutland Peninsula, shared by Denmark (above) and Germany (below). The islands along the lower half of the peninsula’s western coast and extending southwestward along the coast of Germany by the base of the peninsula are the Frisian Islands. The archipelago shields the mudflat region of the Wadden Sea (large parts of which fall dry during low tide) from the North Sea.

Visible off the eastern coast of the peninsula, between Denmark and Sweden, are several large Danish islands. The two largest are Funen (Fyn, in Danish) and Zealand (Sjælland, in Danish). These islands lie between the Kattegat (above) and the Baltic Sea (right).

North Sea and Norway to Sweden and Gulf of Bothnia

63.5N 12.4E

July 22nd, 2011 Category: Mountains

Norway and Sweden - July 14th, 2011

This image stretches across Norway (left), on the coast of the North Sea and the Norwegian Sea, to Sweden (right) and the shores of the Gulf of Bothnia. The two countries are separated by the Scandinavian mountain chain (Skanderna).

The coast of Norway is rugged, broken by huge fjords and thousands of islands. The fjords, best observed in the full image, appear as dark blue line reaching inland from the coast.

Gulf of Bothnia Between Finland and Sweden

64.4N 21.9E

July 12th, 2011 Category: Snapshots

Sweden and Finland - July 7th, 2011

The large body of water extending from the center to the lower part of this image is the Gulf of Bothnia, the northernmost arm of the Baltic Sea. It is situated between Finland’s west coast and Sweden’s east coast.

In the south of the gulf lie the Åland Islands, between the Sea of Åland and the Archipelago Sea. The gulf is 725 km (450 mi) long, 80–240 km (50-150 mi) wide and has an average depth of 60 m (200 ft, 33 fathoms). The maximum depth is 295 m (965 ft, 161 fathoms). The surface area is 117,000 km² (45,200 sq mi).

Into the gulf flow a number of rivers from both sides; consequently, a salinity gradient exists from north to south. In the south the water is the normal brackish water of the Baltic Sea, but in the north, in the Bothnian Bay, the salinity is very low. Being nearly fresh, the gulf is frozen over five months every year.