Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Swamp

The Caprivi Strip and Africa’s “Four Corners”

17.5S 23.7E

June 29th, 2009 Category: Rivers, Snapshots

Africa's "Four Corners" - June 21st, 2009

Africa's "Four Corners" - June 21st, 2009

The Caprivi Strip cuts horizontally in from the left and across the central band of this image,  ending to the right of the center. It is bordered by the Okavango, Cuando, Chobe and Zambezi rivers. The area is rich in wildlife and has mineral resources.

The strip is a narrow protrusion of Namibia eastwards about 450 km (280 miles), between Botswana on the south, Angola and Zambia to the north, and Okavango Region to the west.

As such, the area has been nicknamed Africa’s “Four Corners”. The site of this quadruple frontier is by the swamp located slightly northeast of the center.

Bodies of Water and Salt Flats in Southern Africa

April 13th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Africa's "Four Corners" - April 5th, 2009

Africa's "Four Corners" - April 5th, 2009

The countries of Botswana, Namibia, Angola, Zambia and Zimbabwe, can be observed moving counter-clockwise from the lower left. All but Angola have a common border near the center, in a swampy area known as Africa’s “Four Corners”.

Several bodies of waters can be noted, including the Okavango Delta in Botswana (lower left quadrant), the Cuando River in Zambia (upper right quadrant), and a swamp located where the “Four Corners” touch (right of center).

The Makgadikgadi Pan can be found in the lower right quadrant. It is a large salt pan in northern Botswana, the largest salt flat complex in the world, covering 16,000 km2 (6,177.6 sq mi).

Sediments and Swampy Plains of Sumatra, Indonesia – April 4th, 2009

April 4th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Sumatra, Indonesia - March 27th, 2009

Sumatra, Indonesia - March 27th, 2009

Sumatra (also spelled Sumatera) is the largest island completely in western Indonesia. The interior of the island is dominated by two geographical regions: the Barisan Mountains in the west and swampy plains in the east.

In this eastern region, big rivers carry silt from the mountain, forming the vast lowland interspersed by swamps. Here, several rivers pour dark and light brown sediments into the sea, south of the Lingga Islands.

Even if mostly unsuitable for farming, the area is currently of great economic importance for Indonesia. It produces oil from both above and below the soil—palm oil and petroleum.

Swampland in Africa’s “Four Corners”

April 2nd, 2009 Category: Rivers

Africa's "Four Corners" - March 24th, 2009

Africa's "Four Corners" - March 24th, 2009

This dark green area of swampland shows the location of Africa’s ‘Four Corners’, where four countries meet: Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.  Several rivers converge here, including the Chobe River and the Zambezi River.

The 200–300 m wide Chobe forms the border with the extreme tip of Namibia’s Caprivi Strip, though the swamps on the Namibian side prevent any habitation on that side or river crossings to it.

The Caprivi Strip (also known as the Okavango Strip) is a narrow protrusion of Namibia eastwards about 450 km (280 miles), between Botswana on the south, Angola and Zambia to the north, and Okavango Region to the west. Caprivi is bordered by the Okavango, Kwando, Chobe and Zambezi rivers. The area is rich in wildlife and has mineral resources.

Lake Albert, Straddling the Border Between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – March 31st, 2009

March 31st, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Uganda - March 24th, 2009

Uganda - March 24th, 2009

Lake Albert, one of the Great Lakes of Africa, is located in the center of the continent, on the border between Uganda (left) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (right). It is Africa’s seventh largest lake, and ranks as the world’s twenty-seventh largest lake by volume.

Lake Albert is the northernmost of the chain of lakes in the Great Rift Valley; it is about 160 km (100 mi) long and 30 km (19 mi) wide, with a maximum depth of 51 m (168 ft), and a surface elevation of 619 m (2,030 ft) above sea level.

Lake Albert is part of the complicated system of the upper Nile. Its main sources are the Victoria Nile, ultimately coming from Lake Victoria to the southeast, and the Semliki River, which issues from Lake Edward to the southwest. Here, the Semliki is spilling greenish sediments into the lake at the southern end.

The water of the Victoria Nile is much less saline than that of Lake Albert. Its outlet, at the northernmost tip of the lake, is the Albert Nile (which becomes known as the Mountain Nile when it enters Sudan).

At the southern end of the lake, where the Semliki enters, there are swamps. Farther south loom the mighty Ruwenzori Range, while a range of hills called the Blue Mountains tower over the northwestern shore.