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Posts tagged Surprise Lake

Mount Aniakchak in Alaska’s Aleutian Range, USA

56.9N 158.1W

August 30th, 2009 Category: Volcanoes

Alaska, USA - July 28th, 2009

Alaska, USA - July 28th, 2009

Mount Aniakchak is a 3,400 year old volcanic caldera located in the Aleutian Range of Alaska, USA. It has a diameter of about 10 kilometres (6 miles). Within the caldera are several examples of lava flows and cinder cones, as well as a body of water known as Surprise Lake.

The area around the volcano is the Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, all of which is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire. The caldera itself and the surrounding area can be observed free of geometric distortion as the image has been orthorectified.

Mount Aniakchak and Mount Veniaminof, Alaska – February 20th, 2009

February 20th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Alaska - February 17th, 2009

Alaska - February 17th, 2009

Two snow-covered volcanoes, Mount Aniakchak and Mount Veniaminof, are located in the Aleutian Rangeon on this Alaskan peninsula, USA, between the Bering Sea (left) and the Gulf of Alaska (right).

Mount Aniakchak, visible just north of the image center, is a 3,400 year old volcanic caldera (about 10 kilometres [6 mi] in diameter).

It is an extant volcano – at least ten lava flows have occurred since the formation of the caldera; the most recent was in 1931.

Surprise Lake, within the caldera, is the source of the Aniakchak River, a National Wild River. The area around the volcano is the Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve.

To the southwest, Mount Veniaminof is an active stratovolcano located on the Alaska Peninsula. The Alaska Volcano Observatory currently rates Veniaminof as Aviation Color Code Green and Volcano Alert Level Normal.

In modern times the volcano has had numerous small eruptions (over ten of them since 1930); these are located at a cinder cone in the middle of the caldera.

Veniaminof has one of the highest elevations of Alaskan volcanoes. Partly for this reason, it is covered by a glacier that fills most of its large caldera.

Due to the glacier and the caldera walls, there is the possibility for a major flood from a glacier run at some point in the future.