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Super Typhoon Jelawat (18W) Affecting Philippines – September 25th, 2012

16.0N 126.6E

September 25th, 2012 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Super Typhoon Jelawat (18W) – September 25th, 2012

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Track of Super Typhoon Jelawat (18W) - September 25th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 18W

Super Typhoon Jelawat (18W) is currently churning across the Philippines Sea. Jelawat became a dangerous storm over the weekend with a perfectly symmetrical circulation and clear, well-defined eye. The storm underwent explosive intensification, almost doubling strength over the course of 12 hours.

Super Typhoon Jelawat is currently located approximately 400 nautical miles east-northeast of Manila, Philippines, having tracked northward at 4 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 45 feet.

Despite being hundreds of miles away from the Philippines, the system has already brought gusty thunderstorms and drenching rains to the eastern-half of the islands. As the system drifts north and eastward, it will bring the potential to bring major impacts to the islands.

While a direct landfall is not currently forecast, the system’s proximity to Luzon could still lead to serious impacts. Heavy and gusty showers and thunderstorms are expected to bombard the island for days to come. Due to the mountainous terrain of Luzon and much of the Philippines, extreme rainfall amounts, flash-flooding and mudslides are possible. Jelawat is forecast to pass east of Luzon, on a northward path generally near Taiwan.

Nida (26W) Becomes Category 5 Super Typhoon – November 29th, 2009

20.4N 137.8E

November 29th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Nida (26W) - November 28th, 2009

Typhoon Nida (26W) - November 28th, 2009

Track of STY 26W - November 28th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of STY 26W

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Super Typhoon Nida (STY 26w), located approximately 350 nautical miles south-southwest of Iwo To, has tracked north-northeastward at 2 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 34 feet.

Maximum sustained winds are at 140 knots, with stronger gusts of up to 170 knots. Winds of 64 knots extend outward for a radius of 50 to 55 nautical miles from the eye of the storm, while the radius of winds of up to 50 knots is 75 to 80 nautical miles.

Tropical Storm Parma (19W) Hovering Near Philippines; Super Typhoon Melor (20W) on its Way

20.6N 118.8E

October 6th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones, Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Parma (19W) - October 5th, 2009

Tropical Storm Parma (19W) - October 5th, 2009

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Track of TS Parma (19W), left, and STY Melor (20W), right - October 5th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Parma and Melor

In a week that saw Samoa hit by a tsnuami and Indonesia shaken by an earthquake, the Philippines, caught a break: Typhoon Parma (19W) missed the capital of Manila.

Just one week after a hurricane flooded 80 percent of Manila, killing 300 people and displacing at least half a million, the devastated city has been spared a second major storm. Typhoon Parma had threatened to dump even more heavy rains over the city, trigger more landslides, and block relief efforts, reports the CSM.

Though typhoon Parma did strike the island of Luzon, where Manila is located, and kill 16 people, it then bypassed the capital and edged toward the less densely populated north.

Parma was also downgraded to a tropical storm Monday, with winds of 59 mph and gusts of up to 75 mph, according to the Associated Press. The storm is now located approximately 330 nautical miles east-southeast of Hong Kong, has remained quasi-stationary over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 30 feet.

Parma is still expected to cause severe damage, though, dumping heavy rains not just in the northern Philippines but also Taiwan, where 6,000 villagers have been evacuated. Instead of continuing on its path away from the country, it’s predicted to linger over the city of Laoag and surrounding areas until Thursday. That’s because a third typhoon, Melor (to the right in the animated image), churning in the Pacific, is acting “like a magnet” and holding Parma in place, according to Agence France-Presse.

Super Typhoon Melor (20W), on the other hand, is projected to pass over Philippine waters but not hit the mainland. It is now located approximately 500 nautical miles southeast of Okinawa, and has tracked northwestward at 14 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 40 feet.

Super Typhoon Parma (19W) Approaches Philippines

10.4N 131.4E

October 1st, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Super Typhoon Parma (19W) - October 1st, 2009

Super Typhoon Parma (19W) - October 1st, 2009

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Track of Parma - October 1st, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Parma

Super Typhoon Parma (19W), located approximately 615 nautical miles east-southeast of Manila, Philippines, has tracked west-northwestward at 15 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 28 feet.

Meanwhile, Typhoon Melor (20W) has tracked northwestward at 5 knots over the past six hours, and is now located approximately 440 nautical miles east-southeast of Saipan.

Please click here for a previous article on both typhoons.

Typhoon Choi-Wan (15W) Weakens Slightly but Still Category 5 Storm

September 18th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Super Typhoon Choi-Wan - September 18th, 2009

Super Typhoon Choi-Wan - September 18th, 2009

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Position of TY 15W - September 18th, 2009

Position of TY 15W

Track of Choi-Wan - September 18th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Choi-Wan

Typhoon Choi-Wan (15W), located approximately 120 nautical miles west-northwest of Iwo-To, Japan, has crested the western edge of the steering subtropical ridge axis and tracked north-northeastward at 11 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 41 feet.

The strongest storm on the planet has weakened a little since the last time it was observed (click here for previous articles). However, it is still a Category 5 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson classification scale, which less than 1% off all hurricanes reach.

As of today, winds speeds are down to 135 knots or 156 mph, although gusts are still measured up to 180 mph. Choi-wan is expected to weaken and turn extratropical over colder water in the next three days.

In contrast to the lull in the Atlantic basin, this storm in the Pacific Ocean had peaked with winds of 160 mph, gusting over 190 mph. Hurricane force winds extended 120 miles away from the center eye, while tropical storm force winds extended 280 miles from the center eye. The highly active and intensive storms in the western Pacific along with the relatively lull Atlantic season are common during an El Nino year, reports the Examiner.

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