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Mindanao, the Second Largest Island in the Philippines – April 1st, 2010

7.8N 124.8E

April 1st, 2010 Category: Image of the day

Philippines - March 5th, 2010

Philippines - March 5th, 2010

Mindanao is the easternmost island in the Philippines. It is also one of the three island groups in the country, along with Luzon and Visayas. Mindanao is surrounded by seas: the Sulu Sea to the west, the Philippine Sea to the east, and the Celebes Sea to the south.

Mindanao is the second largest island in the country at 94,630 square kilometers, and is the eighth most populous island in the world. The island of Mindanao is larger than 125 countries worldwide, including the Netherlands, Austria, Portugal, Czech Republic, Hungary, Taiwan and Ireland.

The island is mountainous, and is home to Mount Apo, the highest mountain in the country. Of all the islands of the Philippines, Mindanao and Borneo show the greatest variety of physiographic development. High, rugged, faulted mountains, almost isolated volcanic peaks, high rolling plateaus, and broad, level, swampy plains are found there.

Borneo: Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei

May 9th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Borneo - April 23rd, 2009

Borneo - April 23rd, 2009

Borneo is the third largest island in the world and is located at the centre of Maritime Southeast Asia. Administratively, this island is divided between Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei.

Indonesians refer to the island as “Kalimantan.” However, for people outside of Indonesia, “Kalimantan” refers to the Indonesian part of the island, visible here to the East. Some sediments can be seen along the eastern coast, just below the border with Malaysia.

Malaysia’s region of Borneo is called East Malaysia or Malaysian Borneo, partially visible here to the North and West.

The independent nation of Brunei occupies the remainder of the island, near the coast at the far left edge of the image in the area with the least cloud cover.

Borneo is surrounded by the South China Sea to the north and northwest, the Sulu Sea to the northeast, the Celebes Sea and the Makassar Strait to the east, and the Java Sea and Karimata Strait to the south.

Potential for development of tropical cyclone near Philippines remains fair

November 14th, 2008 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Area of convection near the Philippines - November 14th, 2008

Area of convection near the Philippines - November 14th, 2008

Area of convection - enhanced image

Area of convection - enhanced image

The area of convection previously located near 7.5N 129.9E
is now located near 7.3N 127.1E, approximately 90 nautical miles east of Davao, Philippines.

The disturbance seems to have reduced and fragmented convective banding as it approaches Mindanao.

It has a broad circulation with winds of 10 to 15 knots. Upper level analysis shows a Tutt cell to the east providing good equatorward outflow although the vertical wind shear is 10 to 20 knots.

Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 12 to 18 knots. Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 1006mb.

The system is expected to cross into a lower vertical wind shear environment in the Sulu Sea. The potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone remains fair.

source JTWC

Area of Convection in South China Sea Strengthens

November 12th, 2008 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Area of convection, South China Sea - November 12th, 2008

Area of convection, South China Sea - November 12th, 2008

Area of convection - enhanced image

Area of convection - enhanced image

An area of convection associated with the remnats of 24W, located approximately 537km (334mi) west-southwest of Manila, Philippines, between the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea, has become more persistent over the last 12 hours.

The existing low level circulation center (LLCC) has become better organized, with winds at 28 to 37km/h (17 to 23mph), and weak banding has developed. Upper level analysis indicates a marginal environment with light to moderate vertical wind shear and favorable diffluence aloft. Vertical wind shear values have decreased and are expected to continue to decrease as the mid-latitude trough to the North moves eastward.

Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 28 to 37km/h (17 to 23mph). Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 1006mb.

Due to an improved convective signature and lower vertical wind shear, the potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours is fair.

source JTWC

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