Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Strait of Bonifacio

Gulf of Asinara and Strait of Bonifacio by Sardinia and Corsica – May 27th, 2011

40.1N 9.0E

May 27th, 2011 Category: Image of the day

Italy - May 18th, 2011

The Strait of Bonifacio separates the French island of Corsica (above) and the Italian island of Sardinia (below). It is about 7 miles (11 km) wide and also divides the Tyrrhenian Sea (right) from the western Mediterranean Sea (left).

West of the straight is the Gulf of Asinara, a large bay between Asinara Island (on the western extreme of the gulf), Cape Falcone and the town of Castelsardo, in northern Sardinia, Italy.

Mountains of Sardinia and Corsica – December 23rd, 2009

41.2N 9.2E

December 23rd, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Sardinia and Corsica - November 17th, 2009

Sardinia and Corsica - November 17th, 2009

The islands of  Sardinia (below), belonging to Italy, and Corsica (above), belonging to France, are separated by the Strait of Bonifacio. It is about 7 miles (11 km) wide and divides the Tyrrhenian Sea from the western Mediterranean Sea. The strait is notorious for its weather, currents, shoals, and other obstacles.

Mountains comprise two-thirds of Corsica, forming a single chain, some of which is capped with snow in this image. Monte Cinto is the highest peak at 2,706 metres (8,880 ft), and 20 other summits reach higher than 2,000 metres (6,600 ft).

The coasts of Sardinia (1,849 km long) are generally high and rocky, with ample and deep bays and inlets surrounded by smaller isles. The center of the island is occupied by the Gennargentu, a large mountain massif whose highest peaks are Punta La Marmora (1,834 m), Monte Limbara (1,362 m) and Mount Rasu (1,259 m).

The island’s massifs and plateaus are separated by large alluvial valleys and flatlands; the main plains are the Campidano, located in the southwest between Oristano and Cagliari, and the Nurra, in the northwest.

Corsica, France: the Mediterranean’s Fourth Largest Island

42.0N 9.0E

August 10th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Corsica, France - July 28th, 2009

Corsica, France - July 28th, 2009

The French island of Corsica, called Corse in French, is the fourth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It is 183 kilometres (114 mi) long at longest, 83 kilometres (52 mi) wide at widest. The island has 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) of coastline with more than 200 beaches.

Corsica is located 90 kilometres (56 mi) from Tuscany in Italy and 170 kilometres (110 mi) from the Côte d’Azur in France. It is separated from Sardinia (partially visible on the bottom edge) to the south by the Strait of Bonifacio, a minimum of 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) wide.

The island is very mountainous, with Monte Cinto as the highest peak at 2,706 metres (8,880 ft) and 20 other summits of more than 2,000 metres (6,600 ft). Mountains comprise two-thirds of the island, forming a single chain.

Forest comprises 20% of the island. Approximately 3,500 km2 (1,400 sq mi) of the total surface area of 8,680 km2 (3,350 sq mi) are dedicated to nature reserves, mainly in the interior.

The Mediterranean Islands of Sardinia and Corsica – March 2nd, 2009

March 2nd, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Sardinia, Italy - February 26th, 2009

Sardinia, Italy - February 26th, 2009

Sardinia (in Italian: Sardegna) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily), with an area of 24,090 square kilometres (9,301 sq mi).

The island is surrounded by the French island of Corsica to the North, from which it is separated by the the Strait of Bonifacio,  and the Italian Peninsula to the East.

Sardinia is a constitutional part of Italy, with a special statute of regional autonomy under the Italian Constitution.

Sardinia is a generally mountainous island with a few coastal plains. The island’s mountains are divided into three ranges; the highest peaks are in the middle section of the island.

The island has a Mediterranean climate, with hot, dry, windy summers and very mild winters. The climate in the mountains tends to be wetter and cooler than the lower coastal plains; and winter snowfalls are not uncommon in the higher peaks. Here, some snow caps one peak near the center of the island.

Corsica (in French: Corse) is the fourth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It is one of the 26 regions of France, although strictly speaking Corsica is designated as a “territorial collectivity” by law.

Corsica is 183 kilometres (114 mi) long at longest, 83 kilometres (52 mi) wide at widest, has 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) of coastline, more than 200 beaches, and is very mountainous. Here, the mountains near the east coast are clearly visible, while the west coast is partially obscured by a triangular cloud formation.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

April 2018
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

15


Take Action

Widgets