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Posts tagged St. George’s Sound

Sediments in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, USA

29.6N 85W

October 31st, 2012 Category: Sediments

USA – October 26th, 2012

Sediments can be seen in Apalachicola Bay, an estuary and lagoon located on Florida’s northwest coast. The Apalachicola Bay system also includes St. Georges Sound (to the east), St. Vincent Sound and East Bay, covering an area of about 208 square miles (540 km2). Four islands St. Vincent Island to the west, Cape St. George Island and St. George Island to the south, and Dog Island to the east separate the system from the Gulf of Mexico. Water exchange occurs through Indian Pass, West Pass, East Pass and the Duer Channel.

The lagoon has been designated as a National Estuarine Research Reserve and the Apalachicola River is the largest source of freshwater to the estuary. Combined with the Chattahoochee River, Flint River, and Ochlockonee River they drain a watershed of over 20,000 square miles (50,000 km2) at a rate of 19,599 cubic feet (550 m3) per second according to the United States Geological Survey in 2002.

Sediments in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, USA

29.6N 85W

December 1st, 2011 Category: Sediments

USA - November 21st, 2011

Sediments flow out of Apalachicola Bay, an estuary and lagoon located on Florida’s northwest coast. The lagoon has been designated as a National Estuarine Research Reserve and the Apalachicola River is the largest source of freshwater to the estuary. Combined with the Chattahoochee River, Flint River, and Ochlockonee River they drain a watershed of over 20000 sqmi at a rate of 19599 cubic feet per second.

The Apalachicola Bay system also includes St. Georges Sound, St. Vincent Sound and East Bay, covering an area of about 208 sqmi. Four islands: St. Vincent Island to the west, Cape St. George Island and St. George Island to the south, and Dog Island to the east, separate the system from the Gulf of Mexico. Water exchange occurs through Indian Pass, West Pass, East Pass and the Duer Channel.

Shoreline of Florida’s Pan-Handle

April 27th, 2009 Category: Rivers

Coast of Gulf of Mexico - April 9th, 2009

Coast of Gulf of Mexico - April 9th, 2009

The coast of Florida’s pan-handle along the Gulf of Mexico is marked by a string of sandy beaches. To the East, green and tan sediments are present in the water, particularly in St. George’s sound, a waterway between the mainland and a long thin island chain in the lower right quadrant.

Further east, the waters appear dark brown due to sediments being discharged from the Ochlockonee River, a fast running river originating in Georgia, and terminating in Florida.

The Ochlockonee originates in southwest Georgia. As it flows through Ochlockonee River State Park, it is tidally influenced and a mixture of fresh, brackish, and salt water on the way to its terminus in Ochlockonee Bay. From there, it then empties into Apalachee Bay.

Further inland, in the center of the image, Lake Seminole can be seen. It is a man-made lake located in the southwest corner of Georgia along its border with Florida. The Chattahoochee and Flint rivers join in the lake, before flowing from the Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, which impounds the lake, as the Apalachicola River.

The lake contains 37500 acres of water. It is home to many species of fish, as well as alligators, snakes and various waterfowl.

Florida Panhandle Declared Disaster Area

April 23rd, 2009 Category: Floods

Western Florida Panhandle and surroundings - March 30th, 2009

Western Florida Panhandle and surroundings - March 30th, 2009

Storm over Florida Panhandle - March 28th, 2009

Storm over Florida Panhandle - March 28th, 2009

Yesterday, the USA’s President Obama declared nearly a dozen counties in the Florida Panhandle a disaster area.

This declaration is in reference to severe storms, flooding, tornadoes and straight-line winds that battered the Florida Panhandle (and adjacent states). These events occurred on consecutive days from March 29 to April 4 and yet again on April 13.

Here, the main image shows the western part of the Florida Panhandle (right), as well as the shoreline of Alabama (center right), Mississippi (center left) and Louisiana (left), in a cloud-free moment towards the end of the initial 7-day period of rain. Sediments can be seen along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, particularly near New Orleans (left) and St. George’s Sound (right).

The second image shows storm clouds over the panhandle two days earlier, dumping rain on the area. Upon opening the full image, these clouds can be observed covering much of the Mid-west and Northeast, all the way up to the Great Lakes.

The map shows the incredible rainfall took place during the seven-day period ending on March 31. Since that time, in some areas another 8 to 16 inches of rain has fallen, reports the Weather Channel.

Rainfall around Panhandle (source: water.weather.gov)

Rainfall around Panhandle

Tuesday’s order calls for federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. Federal funding will be available to the state, eligible local governments and some nonprofit organizations to repair damage caused by the severe weather. Counties included in the order are Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Liberty, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Walton and Washington. Federal funding also will be available for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Federal disaster aid has also been requested for Florida’s two neighbors, Alabama and Georgia. In Georgia, a presidential disaster declaration covering 33 counties struck by severe weather and floods was requested by the state’s governor, according to the Associated Press.

In Alabama, a federal disaster declaration was sought by the governor after storms hit 20 counties in south and central parts of the state and caused about $26 million in damage to roads, bridges and public buildings from March 30 to April 3.

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