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Posts tagged Solimões River

Rivers Running Through the Amazon Rainforest, Brazil

3.1S 60W

September 29th, 2012 Category: Deforestation, Fires, Rivers

Brazil – September 1st, 2012

Rivers winding their way through Brazil’s Amazon Rainforest appear as tan lines due to the sediments they carry. Visible in the upper part of the image is the Amazon River, the world’s largest river by waterflow. The city of Manaus can be seen near the confluence of the Negro and Solimões (Amazon) Rivers.

Visible cutting diagonally across the lower part of the image is the Madeira River, the Amazon’s biggest tributary, with a length of about 3,250 km (2,020 mi). Some haze can be seen in the lower right quadrant, mostly south of the river. This is caused by smoke from fires, one of which is visible in the full image. As the fire is located near an area of deforestation, it may have been set in order to clear land for grazing, planting crops or human habitation.

Confluence of Negro and Solimões Rivers by Manaus, Brazil

3.1S 60W

September 16th, 2010 Category: Fires, Rivers

Smoke from Fires in Bolivia - September 14th, 2010

The Negro River (dark, upper left) and Solimões River (tan) cross the upper half of this image. The two rivers meet near Manáus, the capital of the state of Amazonas in Brazil.

Their confluence is quite particular, as the rivers’ different colored waters run side by side without mixing for about 6km due to differences in temperature, speed and water density.

The lower half of the image is partially veiled by smoke blowing northward from many fires in Bolivia and Brazil that have been burning over the last month.

Vegetation Index and Deforestation Near Manáus and Santarém, Brazil – December 2nd, 2009

3.1S 60W

December 2nd, 2009 Category: Climate Change, Image of the day, Rivers

Brazil - November 19th, 2009

Brazil - November 19th, 2009

This FAPAR image shows an area of Amazon rainforest in Brazil, between Santarém in the state of Pará, where the Tapajós joins the Amazon River (right edge), and Manáus at the convergence of the Negro and Solimões (Upper Amazon) Rivers (left). FAPAR stands for Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation, which corresponds to the  area’s vegetation index.

In FAPAR images, the color spectrum over land runs from red (1.0), to green, to yellow and white (0.0), while bodies of water, such as the Amazon River running through the image center, generally appear blue.

High photosynthetic activity is present in dark red regions, such as those concentrated on the left side of the image. The photosynthetic activity decreases as one moves to the right side of the image, although green areas are also productive. Yellow to white zones, with the exception of clouds, indicate a low degree of photosynthetic activity; however, few such areas are present here.

Upon opening the full image, the distinctive herringbone pattern of some deforested areas is visible. Near the Amazon River, these areas appear as yellow lines amidst the surrounding green, while in the upper left quadrant the lines are green in contrast to the surrounding dark red.

Lakes Around the Solimões River in Brazil – October 29th, 2009

3.5S 63.2W

October 29th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Brazil - September 29th, 2009

Brazil - September 29th, 2009

The black waters of several lakes stand out against the green rainforest canopy around the muddy brown waters of the Solimões River (Upper Amazon River), west of Manaus in the Brazilian state of Amazonas. The largest of these lakes are, clockwise from the upper right, Lake Badajós, Lake Piorini, Lake Coari and Lake Mamia. All are connected to the Amazon River.

Lake Badajós has a surface area of 246 km2 (95 mi2). It is 68 km (42 mi) long and 10km (6 mi) across at its widest part. The lake’s shoreline length is 193 km (120 mi).

Lake Piorini has a surface area of 324 km2 (125 mi2), a maximum length of 68 km (42 mi), a maximum width of 11km (7 mi), and a shoreline length of 190 km (118 mi).

The surface area of Lake Coari is 624 km2 (241 mi2). The lake has a maximum length of 77 km (48 mi) and is 10km (6 mi) across at its widest. Its shoreline is 280 km (175 mi) long, and it is directly connected to the Amazon River.

Finally, Lake Mamia has a surface area of 200 km2 (78 mi2), a maximum length of 61 km (38 mi), a maximum width of 13km (8 mi), and a shoreline length of 145 km (90 mi). It also has a direct connection to the Amazon.

The “Meeting of Waters” Near Manaus, Brazil – October 24th, 2009

3.1S 60W

October 24th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Brazil - September 29th, 2009

Brazil - September 29th, 2009

The city of Manaus, the capital of the state of Amazonas in Brazil, is situated at the confluence of the Negro and Solimões Rivers. The Negro River, true to its name, appears to have black waters, while the Solimões (or Upper Amazon) River is light brown.

The two rivers’ confluence is called the Meeting of Waters (in Portuguese, Encontro das Águas). For 6 km (3.7 mi) the rivers’ waters run side by side without mixing (near right edge, southeast of the city). This phenomena is due to differences in temperature, speed and water density of the two rivers. The Negro River flows at near 2 km per hour at a temperature of 22°C, while the  Solimões River flows between 4 to 6 km per hour at a temperature of 28°C.

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