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Posts tagged Shark Bay

Salinity and Seagrass of Shark Bay, Australia

25.7S 113.6E

December 20th, 2012 Category: Snapshots

Australia – December 19th, 2012

The waters of Shark Bay, Australia, appear greenish in color due to phytoplankton growth and shallower depths. In the bay’s hot, dry climate, evaporation greatly exceeds the annual precipitation rate. Thus, the seawater in the shallow bays becomes very salt-concentrated, or ‘hypersaline’. Seagrasses also restrict the tidal flow of waters through the bay area, preventing the ocean tides from diluting the sea water. The water of the bay is 1.5 to 2 times more salty than the surrounding ocean waters.

Shark Bay has the largest known area of seagrass, with seagrass meadows covering over 4,800 km² of the bay. The seagrasses are a vital part of the complex environment of the bay. Over thousands of years, sediment and shell fragments have accumulated in the seagrasses to form vast expanses of seagrass beds. This has raised the sea floor, making the bay shallower.

Lake Macleod and Sun Glint Highlighting Shores of Shark Bay, Australia

25.7S 113.6E

December 3rd, 2012 Category: Lakes

Australia – December 1st, 2012

Sun glint highlights the shoreline of Shark Bay, Peron Peninsula and Dirk Hartog Island in Western Australia. The bay itself covers an area of 10,000 km², with an average depth of 10 metres. It is divided by shallow banks and has many peninsulas and islands. The coastline is over 1,500 km long, and there are about 300 km of limestone cliffs overlooking the bay.

Visible to the north, not far inland from the coast, is Lake Macleod, the westernmost lake in Australia. A cool offshore current, coupled with a very flat coastal plain, contributes to the near-desert-like conditions along the coastal region as evidenced by the brown landscape around the lake and the highly reflective salt beds within the lake.

Peron Peninsula and Shark Bay, Australia – April 4th, 2011

25.7S 113.6E

April 4th, 2011 Category: Image of the day

Australia - March 31st, 2011

The Shark Bay World Heritage area is a series of gulfs, inlets, islands and bays and is split in two by the Peron Peninsula on Australias Coral Coast. The greenish color of the waters on either side of the peninsula is due to a mixture of sediments and algae.

Shark Bay World Heritage Area includes the nature reserves of Dirk Hartog, Bernier and Dorre islands and protects a 55% marine and 45% land environment.

 

Lake Macleod and Shark Bay in Western Australia

26.3S 113.7E

November 26th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Salt Flats

Australia - November 9th, 2010

Rivers flowing westward across Western Australia create lighter tan lines in the otherwise red landscape. The white area near the coast in the upper part of the image is Lake Macleod, the westernmost lake in Australia.

Climatically, this part of Western Australia is greatly influenced by the north-flowing Western Australian current that brings cool water northward from Antarctica, which is not conducive to producing inland precipitation.

This cool offshore current, coupled with a very flat coastal plain, contributes to the near-desert-like conditions along the coastal region as evidenced by the brown landscape around the lake and the highly reflective salt beds within the lake. The low point in the lake appears to be near the northern end where the light blues indicate some standing water.

Another notable feature along the western coastline is the Shark Bay World Heritage Site, located in the lower part of the image. It comprises several peninsulas and islands, the largest of which are Peron Peninsula (east) and Dirk Hartog Island (west). The green color in the bay is caused by algae and some sediments.

Red Terrain Across Western Australia to Shark Bay

27.1S 115.1E

October 15th, 2010 Category: Snapshots

Australia - September 5th, 2010

Most of the western part of Australia appears rusty red in color and quite arid, although the presence of vegetation increases as one moves southwards.

Notable features along the western coastline include the Shark Bay World Heritage Site. It is located below the center of the shoreline and contains several peninsulas and islands, the largest of which are Peron Peninsula (east) and Dirk Hartog Island (west).

The bay itself, in which some greenish algae or sediments can be seen, covers an area of 10,000 km², with an average depth of 10 metres.