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Posts tagged Shandong Peninsula

Sediments in Bohai Sea and from Yangtze River, China – October 25th, 2012

31.2N 121.4E

October 25th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

China – October 23rd, 2012

Sediments fill the Bohai Sea (upper left quadrant) and line the coast of northeastern China from the Shandong (or Jiaodong) Peninsula (the eastern limite of the Bohai Sea) to near Shanghai and the mouth of the Yangtze River (below). Sediments can also be observed on the right side of the image, framing the west coast of the Korean Peninsula.

Sediments and Phytoplankton in Bohai Sea, China – September 24th, 2012

38.8N 119.7E

September 24th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Phytoplankton, Sediments

China – September 17th, 2012

Exquisite patterns created by sediments and phytoplankton fill the Bohai Sea, the innermost gulf of the Yellow Sea, China. The Bohai Sea’s limits are marked by the Liaodong Peninsula (upper right) and Shandong Peninsula (lower right). The sediments in Liaodong Bay, west of the similarly named peninsula, are brown in color, while those in Bohai Bay, to the southwest, have a more golden hue and are flanked by green phytoplankton growth.

Haze Over North China Plain by Bohai Sea

37.6N 117.0E

December 19th, 2011 Category: Clouds, Mountains, Sediments

China - December 18th, 2011

A thick fog or haze hangs over the North China Plain and in the valleys of the mountains and hills bordering it. The largest alluvial plain of eastern Asia, it is bordered on the north by the Yanshan Mountains and on the west by the Taihang Mountains at the edge of the Shanxi (‘western mountains’) plateau. To the south, it merges into the Yangtze Plain.

From northeast to southeast, it fronts the Bohai Gulf, the highlands of Shandong Peninsula, and the Yellow Sea. The Yellow River flows through the middle of the plain into Bohai Gulf. Here, both the gulf and sediments from the river are partially visible through the haze.

 

Thick Outflow of Sediments from Yangtze and Han Rivers

38.9N 120.0E

November 12th, 2009 Category: Rivers

China and South Korea - October 21st, 2009

China and South Korea - October 21st, 2009

Sediments line the northeast coast of China and the west coast of the Korean Peninsula, clouding the waters of the Bohai Sea (upper left quadrant) and framing the Shandong Peninsula.

In China, the greatest outflow is coming from the Yangtze River. These sediments spill into the East China Sea near Shanghai on the Yangtze River Delta, appearing concentrated and brown near the coast and spreading outwards in a still thick, greenish plume.

Across the sea by Korea, the discharge of sediments is strongest from the Han River in South Korea. The Han is a major river, formed by the confluence of the Namhan River (South Han River) and the Bukhan River (North Han River). The Han flows through Seoul and then merges with the Imjin River shortly before it flows into the Yellow Sea.

Sediments from Daliao River in Liaodong Bay, China

40.1N 121.2E

October 27th, 2009 Category: Rivers

China and North Korea - October 5th, 2009

China and North Korea - October 5th, 2009

Some sediments are present along the west coast of the Korean Peninsula (lower right quadrant), mainly by South Korea, and along the coast of the Bohai Sea (lower left edge) and Shandong Peninsula (bottom left) in northeast China.

The sediments appear most concentrated in Liaodong Bay, one of the three bays forming the Bohai Sea. It borders Hebei province and Tianjin Municipality. Most of these sediments are flowing forth from the Daliao River, which has its estuary on the shores of the bay.

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