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Posts tagged Semliki River

Sediments in Southern, Swampy Section of Lake Albert, Uganda and DRC

1.7N 30.9E

January 4th, 2012 Category: Lakes

Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo - December 25th, 2011

Lake Albert – also Albert Nyanza and formerly Lake Mobutu Sese Seko – is one of the African Great Lakes. It is Africa’s seventh-largest lake, and the world’s twenty-seventh largest lake by volume. Lake Albert is located in the center of the continent, on the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Lake Albert is the northernmost of the chain of lakes in the Albertine Rift, the western branch of the East African Rift. It is about 160 km (100 mi) long and 30 km (19 mi) wide, with a maximum depth of 51 m (168 ft), and a surface elevation of 619 m (2,030 ft) above sea level.

Lake Albert is part of the complicated system of the upper Nile. Its main sources are the Victoria Nile, ultimately coming from Lake Victoria to the southeast, and the Semliki River, which issues from Lake Edward to the southwest. The water of the Victoria Nile is much less saline than that of Lake Albert. Its outlet, at the northernmost tip of the lake, is the Albert Nile (which becomes known as the Mountain Nile when it enters South Sudan).

At the southern end of the lake, where the Semliki comes in, there are swamps. Here, sediments can be seen tinging the waters in this section of the lake. Farther south loom the mighty Ruwenzori Range, while a range of hills called the Blue Mountains tower over the northwestern shore. The few settlements along the shore include Butiaba and Pakwach.

Lake Edward and Nearby Rivers, Democratic Republic of the Congo

0.3S 29.6E

April 7th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Democratic Republic of the Congo - March 5th, 2010

Democratic Republic of the Congo - March 5th, 2010

Sun glint causes Lake Edward to appear silvery white and nearby rivers to look like white lightning bolts zig-zagging across the lush green landscape of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Lake Edward is located in the western Great Rift Valley, on the border between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda, with its northern shore a few kilometers south of the Equator. It is the smallest of the African Great Lakes.

Lake Edward lies at an elevation of 920 metres, is 77 km long by 40 km wide at its maximum points, and covers a total surface area of 2,325 km² (the 15th largest on the continent).

It is fed by the Nyamugasani, the Ishasha, the Rutshuru, and the Rwindi rivers. It empties to the north via the Semliki River into Lake Albert. Lake George to the northeast empties into Lake Edward via the Kazinga Channel.

The western escarpment of the Great Rift Valley towers up to 2000 m above the western shore of the lake. The southern and eastern shores are flat lava plains. The Ruwenzori Mountains lie 20 km north of the lake.

Lake Albert, Straddling the Border Between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – March 31st, 2009

March 31st, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Uganda - March 24th, 2009

Uganda - March 24th, 2009

Lake Albert, one of the Great Lakes of Africa, is located in the center of the continent, on the border between Uganda (left) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (right). It is Africa’s seventh largest lake, and ranks as the world’s twenty-seventh largest lake by volume.

Lake Albert is the northernmost of the chain of lakes in the Great Rift Valley; it is about 160 km (100 mi) long and 30 km (19 mi) wide, with a maximum depth of 51 m (168 ft), and a surface elevation of 619 m (2,030 ft) above sea level.

Lake Albert is part of the complicated system of the upper Nile. Its main sources are the Victoria Nile, ultimately coming from Lake Victoria to the southeast, and the Semliki River, which issues from Lake Edward to the southwest. Here, the Semliki is spilling greenish sediments into the lake at the southern end.

The water of the Victoria Nile is much less saline than that of Lake Albert. Its outlet, at the northernmost tip of the lake, is the Albert Nile (which becomes known as the Mountain Nile when it enters Sudan).

At the southern end of the lake, where the Semliki enters, there are swamps. Farther south loom the mighty Ruwenzori Range, while a range of hills called the Blue Mountains tower over the northwestern shore.