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Sediments in Lagoa Mirim and Lagoa dos Patos, Brazil and Uruguay

32.7S 52.7W

December 3rd, 2012 Category: Lakes, Sediments

Uruguay and Brazil – December 2nd, 2012

Lagoa Mirim, as it is known in Brazil, or Laguna Merín in Uruguay, is a large estuarine lagoon which extends from the southern Rio Grande do Sul state in Brazil into eastern Uruguay. Lagoa Mirim is about 108 miles (174 km) long by 6 to 22 miles (35 km) wide.

Lagoa Mirim is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a sandy, partially barren isthmus. It is more irregular in outline than its larger neighbor to the north, Lagoa dos Patos, and discharges into the latter through São Gonçalo Channel, which is navigable by small boats. Here, Lagoa Mirim appears greyish brown, while its neighbor to the north shows a mix of dark brown, reddish tan and green.

Both lagoons are the remains of an ancient depression in the coastline shut in by sand beaches built up by the combined action of wind and oceanic currents. They are at the same level as the ocean, but their waters are affected by the tides and are brackish only a short distance above the Rio Grande outlet.

Interconnected Lagoons by Brazil-Uruguay Border: Lagoa dos Patos and Lagoa Mirim

31.1S 51.4W

May 17th, 2012 Category: Lakes

Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina - May 17th, 2012

Visible near the shoreline in the upper part of this image is the Lagoa dos Patos (meaning Lagoon of the Ducks), the second largest lagoon in Latin America and the biggest in Brazil. It is located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil.

The lagoon is 174 miles (280 km) long, has a maximum width of 44 miles (70 km), and a total area of 3,803 sq. mi. (9,850 km). It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a sandbar about 5 miles (8 kilometers) wide. The navigable São Gonçalo Channel, which enters Lagoa dos Patos near the town of Pelotas, connects Lagoa dos Patos to Lagoa Mirim to the south.

Lagoa Mirim (or Laguna Merín in Spanish) is a large estuarine lagoon which extends from southern Rio Grande do Sul state in Brazil into eastern Uruguay. Lagoa Mirim is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a sandy, partially barren isthmus.

Lagoa Mirim is about 108 miles (174 km) long by 6 to 22 miles (35 km) wide. It is more irregular in outline than its larger neighbor to the north, Lagoa dos Patos, and discharges into the latter through São Gonçalo Channel. Lagoa Mirim has no direct connection to the Atlantic, but the Rio Grande, a tidal channel about 24 miles (39 km) long which connects Lagoa dos Patos to the Atlantic, affords an entrance to the navigable inland waters of both lagoons and several small ports.

Lagoa Mirim in Brazil and Uruguay

32.5S 52.7W

March 14th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers, Sediments

Brazil - February 24th, 2010

Brazil - February 24th, 2010

Lagoa Mirim (Portuguese) or Laguna Merín (Spanish) is a large estuarine lagoon which extends from southern Rio Grande do Sul state in Brazil into eastern Uruguay. Lagoa Mirim is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a sandy, partially barren isthmus. Here, greyish brown sediments fill the lagoon, while tan-colored sediments frame the oceanic coastline.

Lagoa Mirim is about 108 miles (174 km) long by 6 to 22 miles (35 km) wide. It is more irregular in outline than its larger neighbor to the north, Lagoa dos Patos, and discharges into the latter through São Gonçalo Channel, which is navigable by small boats.

Lagoa Mirim has no direct connection to the Atlantic, but the Rio Grande, a tidal channel about 24 miles (39 km) long which connects Lagoa dos Patos to the Atlantic, affords an entrance to the navigable inland waters of both lagoons and several small ports.

Both lakes are the remains of an ancient depression in the coastline shut in by sand beaches built up by the combined action of wind and current. They are at the same level as the ocean, but their waters are affected by the tides and are brackish only a short distance above the Rio Grande outlet.

The Jaguarão/Yaguarón River, which forms part of the Brazil-Uruguay boundary line, empties into Lagoa Mirim, and is navigable 26 miles (42 km) up to and beyond the twin towns of Jaguarão (Brazil) and Rio Branco (Uruguay).

Brackish Tan Waters of Lagoa dos Patos, Brazil

30S 51.2W

December 10th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Brazil - November 17th, 2009

Brazil - November 17th, 2009

Lagoa dos Patos is a large lagoon located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul,  near the coast of southern Brazil. A sandbar of about 5 miles (8 kilometers) wide separates it from the Atlantic Ocean, although the Rio Grande at its southern end forms an outlet to the ocean. Here, the lagoon’s brackish waters appear tan in color.

Partially visible to the south is Lagoa Mirim, to which Lagoa dos Patos is connected by the navigable São Gonçalo Channel. Upon opening the full image, the Paraná River can be seen flowing vertically down the left side, marking the border between Brazil and Argentina.

Lagoa dos Patos, Brazil

May 15th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Lagoa dos Patos, Brazil - May 11th, 2009

Lagoa dos Patos, Brazil - May 11th, 2009

Lagoa dos Patos is the second largest lagoon in Latin America and the biggest in Brazil. It is located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. It is 174 miles (280 km) long, has a maximum width of 44 miles (70 km), and a total area of 3,803 sq. mi. (9,850 km).

It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a sandbar about 5 miles (8 kilometers) wide. The navigable São Gonçalo Channel, which enters Lagoa dos Patos near the town of Pelotas, connects Lagoa dos Patos to Lagoa Mirim to the south. The Rio Grande, at the south end of Lagoa dos Patos, forms the outlet to the Atlantic.

This lagoon is evidently the remains of an ancient depression in the coastline shut in by sand beaches built up by the combined action of wind and current. It is at sea level, but its waters are affected by the tides and are brackish only a short distance above the Rio Grande outlet.

Here, its brackish waters indeed appear green, as sediments are present throughout the lagoon and then spread along the coast on the other side of the sandbar.

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