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Posts tagged Sand Dunes

Sand Dunes of Southern Namib Desert, Namibia

25.2S 15.3E

April 9th, 2012 Category: Deserts

Namibia - April 8th, 2012

This image focuses on the southern part of the Namib Desert, a vast dune sea with some of the tallest and most spectacular dunes of the world, ranging in color from pink to vivid orange. In the Sossusvlei area, several dunes exceed 300 meters (984 ft) in height. The complexity and regularity of dune patterns in its dune sea have attracted the attention of geologists for decades, but it remains poorly understood. The entire desert (visible upon opening the full image) occupies an area of around 80,950 km² (31,200 square miles).

Etosha Pan and Phytoplankton Bloom Near Namib Desert, Namibia

18.7S 16.4E

April 3rd, 2012 Category: Deserts, Phytoplankton, Salt Flats

Namibia - March 18th, 2012

Several interesting features of Namibia can be observed in this image: the Etosha Pan (above, center) and the Namib Desert (along the coast). The Etosha Pan is a large endorheic salt pan, forming part of the Kalahari Basin in the north of Namibia. The pan is mostly dry but after a heavy rain it will acquire a thin layer of water, which is heavily salted by the mineral deposits on its surface.

The Namib desert shows a contrast between the gravelly northern half and the sandy southern half, characterized by tall, orange-red sand dunes. Visible offshore is a faint phytoplankton bloom, common in the area due to the mixing of warm and cold ocean currents.

Dasht-e Lut Desert Basin in Iran

30.4N 58.4E

January 31st, 2012 Category: Deserts

Iran - January 19th, 2012

The tan area near the center of this image is part of the Dasht-e Lut, a large salt desert in southeastern Iran. It is the world’s 25th largest desert. Iran’s geography consists of a plateau surrounded by mountains and divided into drainage basins. Dasht-e Lut is one of the largest of these desert basins, 480 kilometers (300 mi) long and 320 kilometers (200 mi) wide

Itis considered to be one of the driest places on Earth. The eastern part of Dasht-e Lut is a low plateau covered with salt flats. In contrast, the center has been sculpted by the wind into a series of parallel ridges and furrows, extending over 150 km (93 mi) and reaching 75 m (250 ft) in height. This area is also riddled with ravines and sinkholes. The southeast is a vast expanse of sand, like a Saharan erg, with dunes 300 m (1000 ft) high, among the tallest in the world.

Rocky and Sandy Zones of Namib Desert, Namibia – December 15th, 2011

18.7S 16.4E

December 15th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Salt Flats

Namibia - December 11th, 2011

This image shows the Namib Desert, along the coast of southern Angola and Namibia. The desert occupies an area of around 80,950 km² (31,200 square miles), stretching from the Usiab River (north) to the town of Lüderitz (south) and from the Atlantic Ocean (west) to the Namib Escarpment (east).

It is about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) long from north to south and its east-west width varies from 30 to 100 miles (50–160 km) The desert can be divided into two distinct sections: rocky desert to the north and sandy desert to the south.

The Southern Namib comprises a vast dune sea with some of the tallest and most spectactular dunes of the world, ranging in color from pink to vivid orange. In the Sossusvlei area, several dunes exceed 300 meters (984 ft) in height.

Visible further inland at the upper right is the Etosha Pan, a large endorheic salt pan, forming part of the Kalahari Basin in the north of Namibia. The 120-kilometre-long (75-mile-long) lakebed is dry mud coated with salt for most of the year, but after a heavy rain it will acquire a thin layer of water.

Reddish-Orange Sands of Rub’ al Khali Desert, Arabian Peninsula – November 15th, 2011

21.7N 51.9E

November 15th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Image of the day

Saudi Arabia - November 14th, 2011

The Rub’ al Khali, meaning “Empty Quarter” in Arabic, is one of the largest sand deserts in the world. It encompasses most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula, including most of Saudi Arabia and areas of Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.

The desert covers some 650,000 square kilometres (250,000 sq mi) (the area between long. 44°30′ −56°30′E., and lat. 16°30′ −23°00′N). It is 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) long, and 500 kilometres (310 mi) wide. Its surface elevation varies from 800 metres (2,600 ft) in the southwest to around sea level in the northeast.

The terrain is covered with sand dunes with heights up to 250 metres (820 ft), interspersed with gravel and gypsum plains. The sand is a reddish-orange color, particularly in the southern and southeastern parts as can be observed in this image, due to the presence of feldspar.

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