Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Sacramento River

California’s Central Valley Parallel to the Pacific Coast, USA – June 10th, 2010

40.6N 122.3W

June 10th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Mountains, Rivers

USA - June 1st, 2010

USA - June 1st, 2010

Central Valley, also known as the Great Central Valley, is located in California, USA. Extending from Shasta county in the north to Kern county in the south, it covers about 18,000 square miles (47,000 square km) and parallels the Pacific coast for about 450 miles (725 km).

Averaging about 40 miles (65 km) in width, it is almost totally enclosed by mountains, including the Klamath Mountains (north), Sierra Nevada (east), Tehachapi Mountains (south), and Pacific Coast Ranges (west). The Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, which run through the Central Valley, are fed mainly by the abundant rains and melting snows of the Sierra Nevada.

Sediments in Interconnected San Francisco Bays, California, USA – October 26th, 2009

37.7N 122.4W

October 26th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

California, USA - August 25th, 2009

California, USA - August 25th, 2009

Sediments from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers flow through a group of interconnected bays in California often collectively referred to as the San Francisco Bay, before spilling out into the Pacific Ocean.

Along this path, the sediments actually flow first into Suisun Bay, which then flows through the Carquinez Strait to meet with the Napa River at the entrance to San Pablo Bay, which in turn connects at its south end to the true San Francisco Bay.

The cities of this region, including San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose, can be seen as grey areas near and along the shores of the bays.

Sacramento and the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California USA – September 5th, 2009

38.5N 121.4W

September 5th, 2009 Category: Image of the day

USA - July 16th, 2009

USA - July 16th, 2009

Sacramento is the capital of the state of California in the USA. The city is located along the Sacramento River and just south of the American River’s confluence in California’s expansive Central Valley.

To the east of the Central Valley is the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The change in elevation from 25 feet (8 meters) above mean sea level in the valley around Sacramento to around 6000 feet (about 1830 meters) at the right edge can be observed in this orthorectified image.

California Central Valley and Coastal Ranges

37.9N 121.2W

July 2nd, 2009 Category: Rivers, Snapshots

California, USA - June 30th, 2009

California, USA - June 30th, 2009

This orthorectified ASAR (radar) image shows two geographical divisions of California, USA: the South Coast Ranges and the Central Valley.

The South Coast Ranges run north and south, parallel to the Pacific Coast, between San Francisco Bay to the north, the California Central Valley to the east, the Transverse Ranges to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west.

Much of the Central Valley is used for agriculture, although many populated areas are also visible. The bright white patch in the center, surrounded by farmland, is the city of Stockton. In and around Stockton are thousands of miles of waterways and rivers that make up the California Delta.

One important body of water visible here, at the upper left, is Suisun Bay, a shallow tidal estuary. It lies at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, thus forming the entrance to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, an inverted river delta.

San Francisco Bay, California, USA

37.7N 122.4W

May 26th, 2009 Category: Rivers

San Francisco Bay, California, USA - May 12th, 2009

San Francisco Bay, California, USA - May 12th, 2009

San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining from approximately forty percent of California, USA, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean.

Technically, both rivers flow into Suisun Bay, which flows through the Carquinez Strait to meet with the Napa River at the entrance to San Pablo Bay, which connects at its south end to San Francisco Bay, although the entire group of interconnected bays are often referred to as “San Francisco Bay.”

The Bay covers somewhere between 400 and 1,600 square miles (1,040 to 4,160 square kilometers), depending on which sub-bays (such as San Pablo Bay), estuaries, wetlands, and so on are included in the measurement.

Here, the waters in the bay and sub-bays is tan from sediments. Further inland, the tan, silt-laden rivers stand out easily against the green and brown of the surrounding landscape.

The main part of the Bay measures 3 to 12 miles (5 to 20 km) wide east-to-west and somewhere between 48 miles (77 km) and 60 miles (97 km) north-to-south.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

December 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

50


Take Action

Widgets