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Posts tagged Queen Maud Land

Ice Rumples and Icebergs in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica

71S 26.0E

October 14th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Antarctica - August 16th, 2009

Antarctica - August 16th, 2009

This large area of rumpled, cracking ice is located on the shores of Queen Maud Land (Dronning Maud Land), part of the Norwegian Antarctic Claim.

It has a land area of approximately 2.5 million square kilometers (one million sq mi), mostly covered by the Antarctic ice sheet lying between the British claim and the Australian claim.

In this part of Queen Maud Land, many icebergs can be seen breaking off the Antarctic Ice Sheet and floating into the Antarctic Ocean.

Iceberg Calving Off Antarctic Ice Sheet

69.6S 4.2E

September 16th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Antarctica - August 23rd, 2009

Antarctica - August 23rd, 2009

A large iceberg breaks off the shores of the Antarctic Ice Sheet in Queen Maud Land, or Dronning Maud Land, and floats away in the Southern Ocean. Other smaller icebergs can also be seen floating between the main one and the edge of the ice sheet. Many cracks and rifts are visible in the ice sheet itself.

When a mass of ice suddenly splits off and moves away from its parent glacier, iceberg, or ice shelf in such a way, the event is called calving. Calving of ice shelves is usually preceded by a rift. This ice calving or iceberg calving is a form of ice ablation or ice disruption.

Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

80.4S 35.1W

August 15th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Antarctica - June 30th, 2009

Antarctica - June 30th, 2009

Coats Land is a region in Antarctica which lies westward of Queen Maud Land and forms the eastern shore of the Weddell Sea.

The Brunt Ice Shelf, visible here, borders the Antarctic coast of Coats Land, Antarctica, between the Dawson-Lambton Glacier and the Stancomb-Wills Glacier Tongue.

The Brunt Icefalls extend along Caird Coast, a portion of the shore of Coats Land, for about 80 km (50 mi), where the steep and jagged ice-covered coast descends to Brunt Ice Shelf.

Western Queen Maud Land, Antarctica

76.1S 21W

August 8th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Antarctica - June 30th, 2009

Antarctica - June 30th, 2009

Various cracks, indentations and rumples in the ice can be seen in the full version of this image of part of watern Queen Maud Land, Antarctica.

Queen Maud Land is an English translation of Dronning Maud Land, the official name for the part of Antarctica claimed by Norway as a dependent territory. This claim, like all others in the Antarctic, is not universally recognized and is subject to the terms of the Antarctic Treaty System.

It has a land area of approximately 2.5 million square kilometers (one million sq mi), mostly covered by the Antarctic ice sheet lying between the British claim, at 20°W and the Australian claim, at 44°38’E.

Glaciers and Ice Rises in Antarctica

78S 33.7W

August 6th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Antarctica - June 30th, 2009

Antarctica - June 30th, 2009

Both glaciers (upper right) and ice rises (lower right) can be observed in this view of Antarctica between the Ronne Ice Shelf and Queen Maud Land. A glacier is a large mass of ice moving slowly over some land surface or down a valley, formed over long periods from the accumulation of snow in areas where the amount of snow that falls exceeds the amount that melts.

While glaciers can be found on all continents except Australia, ice rises are found only on the ice shelves of Antarctica, mostly on the Ronne Ice Shelf. The largest ice rises exceed dimensions of 50 by 200 km, or 10 000 km² in area.

An ice rise is a clearly defined elevation of the otherwise totally flat ice shelf, typically dome-shaped and rising 100 to 200 meters above the surrounding ice shelf. An ice rise forms where the ice shelf touches the rocky seabed because of an elevation that does not reach sea level.

The ice shelf flows over this obstacle, which is completely covered by ice, with no rock exposed, thereby forming an ice rise. The resulting tension forms crevasses around the ice rise. Although ice rises are typically located within the ice shelf area, they can partially face the open sea.

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