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Posts tagged Quebec

Fires in Manitoba and Quebec by Hudson Bay, Canada

51.0N 80.2W

June 29th, 2013 Category: Fires VIIRSSuomi-NPP

Canada – June 28th, 2013

Fires can be seen in several locations near the Hudson Bay, Canada, in this image. Several plumes are visible in Quebec, east of James Bay, the southern extension of the Hudson Bay (lower right quadrant). The smoke from these fires is blowing towards the west. Another cluster of fires is visible in Manitoba, near the mouth of the Nelson River where it spills into Hudson Bay (center left). The plumes of smoke from those fires blows towards the southwest.

Fires East of James Bay, Canada

51.8N 78.1W

June 29th, 2013 Category: Fires MODISAqua

Canada – June 28th, 2013

Several large fires burning in the Canadian province of Quebec, east of James Bay, the southernmost reaches of the Hudson Bay, release thick white smoke. The plumes of smoke from the fires nearest the bay blow westward, while those further east blow to the northwest. The smoke from those clustered near the shores of the bay release thick smoke that fans out as it cross the shoreline, obscuring the rich brown sediments coloring the waters below.

Large Plumes of Smoke from Wildfires Near James Bay, Canada – June 22nd, 2013

51.9N 78W

June 22nd, 2013 Category: Fires, Image of the day, Sediments MODISTerra

Canada – June 22nd, 2013

Several large fires can be seen burning in Quebec, east of James Bay (left edge), in Canada. The fires are releasing thick plumes of white smoke that blow mostly towards the east. James Bay appears brown in color due to sediment washed in from numerous rivers.

Effects of Global Warming in Quebec, Canada

47.7N 77.6W

June 21st, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Vegetation Index AVHRRMetOp

USA and Canada – June 21st, 2013

Record floods, melting permafrost, shoreline erosion, intense winds and higher than normal temperatures have caused problems in Quebec, Canada. The higher temperatures add to the credibility of climate models that have predicted the march of global warming will accelerate the more greenhouse gases we pump into the atmosphere, scientists say.

According to Environment Canada, spring temperatures in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River region, which includes Montreal and Quebec City, were 54 per cent higher than normal. This is the highest percentage deviation from the norm recorded since 1948.

The warmer winters are already endangering coastlines, the northern communities that are built on permafrost and forests, which probably will not be able to adapt fast enough to a warmer climate. Warmer temperatures in all seasons indicate Quebec is well on its way to meeting the climate-model predictions that we are fast closing in on the 2C mark many scientists claim is the tipping point that will plunge the globe into catastrophic climate change.

The models indicate mean temperatures in the southern half of Quebec will be 2C to 3C higher than normal by 2020. In northern Quebec, the warming will be even higher. And at the present rate of warming as tracked since 1948, we are on track to be well over 4C by 2050 and as high as 7C to 9C by 2080 (click here for more information).

Climate Change’s Potential Effects on Lake Ontario and Saint Lawrence River, Canada and USA

43.6N 78.1W

April 7th, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Lakes, Rivers

USA and Canada – April 6th, 2013

Snow dusts the landscape of part of the northeastern USA and Canada, framing the shores of the Saint Lawrence River. The river traverses the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario and forms part of the international boundary between Ontario and New York in the United States. It is the primary drainage conveyor of the Great Lakes Basin, and in this image can be seen connected to Lake Ontario.

In the opinion of some experts, a temperature increase of 2 to 4°C could lower the average flow from Lake Ontario by 24%. Lake Ontario is the major source for the St. Lawrence River, and a decrease in flow of this magnitude could result in a 1-metre drop in water levels in some areas of the St. Lawrence.

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