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Posts tagged Pyrenees

Climate Change and the Pyrenees, Spain and France

42.4N 1.5E

March 3rd, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Mountains

Spain – March 2nd, 2013

Europe’s mountain regions may suffer some of the most severe impacts of climate change. Increasing temperatures can change snow-cover patterns and lead to water shortages. Species may also face extinction if unable to move northward or uphill.

Temperatures are rising faster in mountainous regions, making them particularly vulnerable to climate change. Glaciers in the Pyrenees, whose snow-capped peaks are visible in the upper right quadrant, along the France-Spain border, have shrunk considerably over the past 150 years.

 

Snow Atop the Pyrenees, France and Spain

42.6N 1.0E

February 13th, 2013 Category: Mountains

Spain and France – January 25th, 2013

Snow sits atop the peaks of the Pyrenees, a range of mountains in southwest Europe that forms a natural border between France and Spain, with the tiny country of Andorra sandwiched in between. The range also separates the Iberian Peninsula from the rest of continental Europe, and extends for about 491 km (305 mi) from the Bay of Biscay (Cap Higuer) to the Mediterranean (Cap de Creus).

The Pyrenees are older than the Alps: their sediments were first deposited in coastal basins during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras. The eastern part of the Pyrenees consists largely of granite and gneissose rocks, while in the western part the granite peaks are flanked by layers of limestone. The massive and unworn character of the chain comes from its abundance of granite, which is particularly resistant to erosion, as well as weak glacial development.

Pyrenees North of Ebro River Delta, Spain

41.7N 1.9E

January 3rd, 2012 Category: Mountains, Rivers

France - December 26th, 2011

The snow-capped Pyrenees stretch from the center left to the center of this image of France (above) and Spain (below), forming a natural border between the two countries. It separates the Iberian Peninsula from the rest of continental Europe, and extends for about 491 km (305 mi) from the Bay of Biscay (Cap Higuer) to the Mediterranean Sea (Cap de Creus).

Visible further down the coast is the delta of the Ebro River, one of the most important rivers in the Iberian Peninsula. It is the biggest river by discharge volume in Spain. The Ebro Delta, in the Province of Tarragona, Catalonia, is one of the largest wetland areas (320 km²) in the western Mediterranean region. The Ebro delta has expanded rapidly on soils washed downriver. The rounded form of the delta attests to the balance between sediment deposition by the Ebro and removal of this material by wave erosion.

Snow-Capped Pyrenees Extending to Cap de Creus, Spain and France

42.4N 1.5E

December 15th, 2011 Category: Mountains

Spain - December 11th, 2011

The Pyrenees is a range of mountains in southwest Europe that forms a natural border between France (above) and Spain (below). It separates the Iberian Peninsula from the rest of continental Europe, and extends for about 491 km (305 mi) from the Bay of Biscay (Cap Higuer) to the Mediterranean Sea (Cap de Creus, visible at the right edge).

In the Western Pyrenees, the average elevation gradually increases from the west to the east, from the Basque mountains near the Bay of Biscay of the Atlantic Ocean. In the Eastern Pyrenees, with the exception of one break at the eastern extremity of the Pyrénées ariégeoises, the mean elevation is remarkably uniform until a sudden decline occurs in the easternmost portion of the chain known as the Albères.

Pyrenees and Gironde Estuary, France

43.8N 0.6W

October 24th, 2011 Category: Mountains, Rivers, Sediments

France - October 23rd, 2011

The Pyrenees, a range of mountains in southwest Europe that forms a natural border between France and Spain, can be visible parallel to the lower edge of this image. It extends for about 491 km (305 mi) from the Bay of Biscay (Cap Higuer) to the Mediterranean Sea (Cap de Creus).

Visible along the coast of France at the center left is the Gironde estuary, formed by the meeting of the Dordogne and Garonne Riers just below the centre of Bordeaux. Tan sediments can be seen in the estuary, which is subject to very strong tidal currents, and spilling out into the Bay of Biscay.

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