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Posts tagged Puget Sound

Climate Change and Glaciers of Olympic Mountains, USA – April 1st, 2013

47.9N 124W

April 1st, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Image of the day, Mountains

USA and Canada – March 30th, 2013

Snow rests atop mountain ranges in Washington State, USA (below), and British Columbia (upper left) and Alberta (upper right), Canada. Visible as a circular area of snow near the coast are the Olympic Mountains, a mountain range on the Olympic Peninsula of western Washington.

The mountains, part of the Pacific Coast Ranges, are not especially high – Mount Olympus is the highest at 7,962 ft (2,427 m); however, the eastern slopes rise out of Puget Sound and the western slopes are separated from the Pacific Ocean by the 20 to 35 km (12 to 22 mi) wide Pacific Ocean coastal plain. There are glaciers within the range; however, they have shrunk rapidly in just decades, stark evidence of the ongoing impact of human-driven climate change.

Salish Sea and Pacific Coast Ranges on Canada-USA Border

48.3N 123.3W

June 19th, 2012 Category: Mountains

USA and Canada - May 15th, 2012

The Salish Sea, visible in the upper left quadrant, is the intricate network of coastal waterways located between the south-western tip of the Canadian province of British Columbia, and the north-western tip the U.S. state of Washington. Its major bodies of water are the Strait of Georgia, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Puget Sound. The inland waterways of the Salish Sea are partially separated from the open Pacific Ocean (a pelagic zone) by Vancouver Island and the Olympic Peninsula. The latter is located in the state of Washington on the southern shores of the sea. The snow-capped mountains there are known as the Olympic Mountains and are part of the Pacific Coast Ranges.

Straits of Georgia and San Juan de Fuca, USA and Canada

49.3N 123.8W

July 28th, 2011 Category: Mountains

USA - July 25th, 2011

Two straits can be observed in this image of the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Washington State, USA. To the north is the Strait of Georgia, between Vancouver Island (as well as its nearby Gulf Islands) and the mainland coast of British Columbia, Canada. It is approximately 240 km long and varies in width from 18.5 to 55 kilometres (11.5 to 34 mi).

Archipelagos and narrow channels mark each end of the Strait of Georgia, the Gulf Islands and San Juan Islands in the south, and the Discovery Islands in the north. The main channels to the south are Haro Strait and Rosario Strait, which connect the Strait of Georgia to the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

The Strait of Juan de Fuca, visible south of the large Vancouver Island, is a large body of water about 95 mi long forming the principal outlet for the Georgia Strait and Puget Sound, connecting both to the Pacific Ocean. It provides part of the international boundary between the United States and Canada.

Visible at the top edge are the snow-capped peaks of the Pacific Ranges, the southernmost subdivision of the Coast Mountains portion of the Pacific Cordillera. Located entirely within British Columbia, Canada, they run northwest from the lower stretches of the Fraser River to Bella Coola.

Whidbey Island on Northern Boundary of Puget Sound, USA

47.9N 122.4W

February 18th, 2011 Category: Snapshots

Canada - February 1st, 2011

This orthorectified image focuses on Whidbey Island, one of nine islands located in Island County, Washington, in the United States.

Whidbey is located about 30 miles (48 km) north of Seattle, and lies between the Olympic Peninsula and the I-5 corridor of western Washington. The island forms the northern boundary of Puget Sound.

Whidbey Island is approximately 35 miles (56 km) long (from the extreme north to extreme south, and 1.5 to 12 miles (2.4 to 19 km) wide, with 168.67 square miles (436.85 km²), making it the 40th largest island in the United States.

Puget Sound and Snake River in Washington State, USA

47.9N 122.5W

August 11th, 2010 Category: Rivers

USA - August 29th, 2010

The body of water in the upper left corner is Puget Sound, a complex estuarine system of interconnected marine waterways and basins, in the US state of Washington. The sound extends approximately 100 miles (160 km) from Deception Pass in the north to Olympia, Washington in the south.

The term “Puget Sound” is used not just for the body of water but also the general region centered on the sound, including the Seattle metropolitan area, home to about 3.4 million people. This region appears as a greyish area on the shores of the sound.

Most of the area surrounding the sound and down the coastline appears fertile and green. Areas further inland are drier and tan in color. The Snake River, however, can be seen flowing across this drier area, with some areas of irrigation nearby.

The Pacific coastline and some areas of higher elevations are flanked or dotted, respectively, by clouds. Also visible in the lower left quadrant are condensation trails – straight lines of clouds formed around the exhaust of airplanes.

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