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Posts tagged Promontory Mountains

Lucin Cutoff Crossing Promontory Point of Great Salt Lake, USA – October 6th, 2011

41.6N 112.5W

October 6th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Mountains

USA - October 3rd, 2011

This orthorectified image shows part of the Great Salt Lake, in Utah, USA. The lake itself appears dark grey, with bridges crossing it visible as long, light grey lines. The checkered area in the upper right quadrant is a series of man-made salt pans from which minerals are extracted.

Crossing the image from the top center to the middle are the Promontory Mountains, located on a promontory (peninsula) in the northern part of the Great Salt Lake. Promontory Point is at the southern tip of the range. Today, trains cross the point via the Lucin Cutoff railroad causeway across the lake, visible, as mentioned previously, as a think grey line.

Promontory and Raft River Mountains North of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

41.1N 112.6W

September 28th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Utah, USA - August 30th, 2009

Utah, USA - August 30th, 2009

The landscape north of the Great Salt Lake (lower right) in this  orthorectified image of Utah, USA, includes several mountain ranges, while the Great Salt Lake Desert can be seen to the west.

The small ridge in the upper left quadrant is known as the Raft River Mountains. This range includes George Peak, a mountain summit that climbs to 9,567 feet (2,916.02 meters) above sea level.

The larger range running north-south on the right side of the image is the Promontory Mountains. This range reaches down into the lake, creating a 20mi long peninsula.

Running through Promontory Point at the tip of this peninsula is a railroad on a causeway called the Lucin Cutoff, identifiable here as a straight white line cutting across the lake and desert.

Mountain Ridges Near Great Salt Lake and Desert, Utah, USA

41.1N 112.6W

September 10th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Utah, USA - July 26th, 2009

Utah, USA - July 26th, 2009

Two significant mountain ridges can be observed in this  orthorectified image of the Great Salt Lake (right) and Desert (left) in the state of Utah, USA.

The ridge rising up above the flat salt desert in the lower left corner is called the Newfoundland Mountains. Their highest summit is the rugged Desert Peak at 6800 feet, ascending about 2800 feet from the surrounding salt flats.

Moving across to the other side of the lake, the Promontory Mountains run north-south and jut out into the water, forming a twenty mile long peninsula whose southernmost tip is called Promontory Point.

Major peaks of the Promontory range are Messix Peak at 7,349 feet (2,239.98 m), Mt. Tarpey at 6,965 feet (2,122.93 meters), and Lead Mountain at 5,781 feet (1,762.05 meters).

The Promontories have historical significance because the First Transcontinental Railroad was completed just north of the range, at Promontory, Utah. Today, trains pass Promontory Point via the Lucin Cutoff, a railroad trestle that crosses the lake, visible here as a white line across the black lake waters.

Evaporation Ponds of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA – June 6th, 2009

41.1N 112.6W

June 6th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA - June 2nd, 2009

Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA - June 2nd, 2009

Evaporation ponds, northeast

Evaporation ponds, northeast

Evaporation ponds, southwest

Evaporation ponds, southwest

The Great Salt Lake in northern Utah, USA, is the largest salt lake in the western hemisphere, famous for its very high salinity that makes its water far saltier than that of the sea.

Salt Lake City and its suburbs are located to the southeast and east of the lake, between the lake and the Wasatch Mountains, but land around the north and west shores is almost uninhabited.

Of particular interest in this ASAR image are the salt evaporation ponds on the northeastern and southwestern parts of the lake. Salt evaporation ponds are shallow man-made ponds designed to produce salts from sea water, or in this case, highly saline lake water.

The salty water is fed into large ponds and water is drawn out through natural evaporation, which allows the salt to be subsequently harvested.  The ponds are commonly separated by levees, which are visible here as white lines across the black water.

The close-up of the southwestern area shows evaporation ponds between the shoreline of Lakeside Valley (left) and Stansbury Island (right). The two mountain ranges visible are the similarly named Lakeside Mountains (left) and the Stansbury Mountains (bottom). The various mountain ranges seen here are very sharp and detailed, as the image has been orthorectified.

The other close-up focuses on the evaporation ponds in the northeastern area, between Bear River Bay (left) and Willard Bay (right).  The mountain range jutting into the lake is called the Promontory Mountains, with Fremont Island below. The long, white long stretching from the mainland, crossing the southern end of Promontory Peninsula, and then heading westward, is a railway line on a long causeway called the Lucin Cutoff.