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Posts tagged Port Said

Nile River from Lake Nasser to Nile Delta, Egypt

30.0N 31.2E

April 10th, 2012 Category: Rivers

Egypt - April 9th, 2012

The Nile River flows northward from Lake Nasser on the Sudan-Egypt border towards the bottom of this image, to the Nile Delta, the delta formed in Northern Egypt where the Nile spreads out and drains into the Mediterranean Sea. It is one of the world’s largest river deltas—from Alexandria in the west to Port Said in the east, it covers 240 km of Mediterranean coastline—and is a rich agricultural region. Numerous towns can be observed throughout the region as tan dots across the green terrain. From north to south the delta is approximately 160 km in length. The Delta begins slightly down-river from Cairo, which is only  partially visible at the stem of the delta due to cloud cover.

Cairo At Base of Nile River Delta, Egypt

30.0N 31.2E

October 7th, 2011 Category: Rivers

Egypt - October 2nd, 2011

The Nile Delta is the delta formed in Northern Egypt (Lower Egypt) where the Nile River spreads out and drains into the Mediterranean Sea. Sediments are visible along the coastline near the delta.

It is one of the world’s largest river deltas—from Alexandria in the west to Port Said in the east, it covers some 240 km of Mediterranean coastline—and is a rich agricultural region. From north to south the delta is approximately 160 km in length. The Delta begins slightly down-river from Cairo, which is visible as a grey area at the base of the fan-shape.

Lake Manzala on the Nile Delta, Egypt

31.2N 32.2E

May 28th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Egypt - May 13th, 2009

Egypt - May 13th, 2009

The brackish waters of Lake Manzala (also Manzaleh), in northeastern Egypt on the Nile Delta near Port Said (far right), appear various shades of green.

As of 2008 the lake, sometimes called a lagoon, was 47km long and 30km wide, making it the largest of the northern deltaic lakes of Egypt.

Lake Manzala is long but quite shallow; it’s natural depth is only four to five feet. However, alterations to the depth were made during the construction of the Suez Canal (far right) to allow ships to pass. The Canal now extends 29 miles lengthwise along the lake.

In addition to the changes to its depth, the lake has undergone other alterations over the last three decades: pollution and lake drainage have reduced the lake’s productivity.

The government of Egypt drained substantial portions of the lake in an effort to convert its rich Nile deposits to farmland. By 2001, Lake Manzala had lost approximately 80 percent of its former area through the effects of drainage efforts.

The project was unprofitable: crops did not grow well in the salty soil and the value of resulting produce was less than the market value of the fish that the reclaimed land had formerly yielded.

The Suez Canal, Egypt

February 3rd, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Suez Canal, Egypt - January 28th, 2009

Suez Canal, Egypt - January 28th, 2009

Despite some cloud cover near its two ends, the Suez Canal, in Egypt, can be seen running from top to bottom in this full resolution image.

The canal, opened in 1869, connects the Mediterranean Sea (top) and the Red Sea (bottom) so that water transportation can be affected between Europe and Asia without navigating around Africa or carrying goods overland.

The canal is 193 km (120 mi) long. It is single-lane with 4 passing places north and south of the Great Bitter Lake (center). It contains no locks; seawater flows freely through the canal into the Great Bitter Lake from both the Red Sea in the south and the Mediterranean in the north, replacing evaporation.

A green algal bloom can be seen along the shoreline around Port Said (the northern terminus of the canal), as well as in the Great Bitter Lake.

The southern terminus in the Gulf of Suez, in the Red Sea, appears to have less algae, although this is difficult to discern due to the partial cloud cover.

source Wikipedia