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Posts tagged Pontic Mountains

Mountains Framing Black Sea

41.8N 40.9E

April 23rd, 2012 Category: Mountains

Black Sea - January 2nd, 2012

This wide-swath ASAR image shows part of the Black Sea, which has a total area of 436,400 km2 (168,500 sq mi), a maximum depth of 2,212 m (7,257 ft), and a volume of 547,000 km3 (131,200 cu mi). The Black Sea forms in an east-west trending elliptical depression which lies between Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine. It is constrained by the Pontic Mountains to the south, the Caucasus Mountains to the east. This image shows the contours of the mountains by its eastern shoreline, by Turkey and Georgia.

Pontic Mountains and Lakes Van and Urmia, Turkey and Iran

38.6N 42.9E

July 5th, 2011 Category: Lakes, Mountains

Turkey and Iran - June 21st, 2011

The Pontic Mountains frame the southern coast of the Black Sea in the upper left quadrant of this image focusing on Turkey.

Several other lakes can be observed, including Lake Van, in Turkey (center) and Lake Urmia, in northwestern Iran. The former appears dark blue with some lighter areas colored by sediments, while the latter appears reddish and ringed by white salt flats.

 

The Black Sea, from the Danube Delta in the West to the Caucasus Mountains in the East – June 15th, 2011

43.7N 33.8E

June 15th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Mountains

Black Sea - May 18th, 2011

The Black Sea occupies the majority of this image. It has an area of 436,400 km2 (168,500 sq mi), not including the Sea of Azov (the body of water northeast of the Crimean Peninsula that is lined with sediments and connected to the Black Sea by the Strait of Kerch).

The Black Sea forms in an east-west trending elliptical depression which lies between Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine. The longest east-west extent is about 1,175 km.

It is constrained by the Pontic Mountains to the south, the Caucasus Mountains (capped with snow by the right edge) to the east and features a wide shelf to the northwest. Visible on the western shores is the delta of the Danube River.

 

Mountains of Central and Eastern Turkey

38.7N 34.2E

July 15th, 2010 Category: Mountains

Turkey - July 4th, 2010

Turkey - July 4th, 2010

Central and eastern Turkey, a transcontinental Eurasian country, can be observed here. The territory of Turkey is more than 1,600 kilometres (1,000 mi) long and 800 km (500 mi) wide, with a roughly rectangular shape.

The Asian part of the country, Anatolia, consists of a high central plateau with narrow coastal plains, between the Köroğlu and Pontic mountain ranges to the north and the Taurus Mountains to the south. Eastern Turkey has a more mountainous landscape and is home to the sources of rivers such as the Euphrates, Tigris and Aras, and contains Lake Van and Mount Ararat, Turkey’s highest point at 5,165 metres (16,946 ft).

Upon opening the full image, these areas of mountain ranges and plains can be observed clearly. The higher elevations near the northern coast are capped with clouds, while those to the south are clear.

Georgia, Between the Greater Caucasus Mountains and Pontic Mountains

January 20th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Georgia, Between the Greater Caucasus Mountains and Pontic Mountains - December 2nd, 2008

Georgia, Between the Greater Caucasus Mountains and Pontic Mountains - December 2nd, 2008

Snow caps the the southern side of the Greater Caucasus Mountain Range (above) and the peaks of the Pontic Mountains (below).  They are separated by the Black Sea and a green valley, including the Kolkhida Lowlands by the shore.

Many rivers can be seen flowing down the mountainside; most are tan in color due to sediments, while one, just north of the Kolkhida Lowlands, is a striking turquoise green.

Part of these ranges is within the borders of the country of Georgia, which also occupies the lowlands between them.

The Caucasus Mountains are in Eurasia between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. They are comprised of two separate mountain systems: the Greater Caucasus Mountain Range and the Lesser Caucasus Mountains.

The Greater Caucasus Range extends from the Caucasian Natural Reserve in the vicinity of Sochi on the northeastern shore of the Black Sea, generally trending east-southeast and reaching nearly to Baku on the Caspian Sea, while the Lesser Caucasus runs parallel to the greater range, at a distance averaging about 100 km (60 mi) south.

The Greater and Lesser Caucasus ranges are connected by the Likhi Range, which separates the Kolkhida Lowlands (close to the shore) from the Kura Depression (Kura Lowland, far right).

The highest peak in the Caucasus range is Mount Elbrus in the Greater Caucasus, which rises to a height of 18,506 feet (5,642 meters) above sea level.

The Pontic Mountains, on the other hand, are a range of mountains in northern Turkey, whose eastern end extends into southeastern Georgia. The range runs roughly east-west, parallel and close to the southern coast of the Black Sea. The highest peak in the range is Kaçkar Dağı, which rises to 3942 meters elevation (12,933 feet).

The part of the mountains that is not snow capped appears dark green, as they are generally covered by dense forests, predominantly of conifers.