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Posts tagged Po Valley

Haze Over Northern Italy and Sediments Around Gargano Promontory

40.5N 15.0E

March 6th, 2012 Category: Clouds, Rivers, Sediments, Volcanoes

Italy - March 3rd, 2012

Sediments line the Adriatic coast of Italy, particularly around the Gargano Promontory. Gargano is a historical and geographical Italian sub-region situated in Apulia, consisting of a wide isolated mountain massif made of highland and several peaks and forming the backbone of the Gargano Promontory projecting into the Adriatic Sea.

Moving northwards, haze can be seen over the Po Valley in the upper left quadrant. The valley is a plain around the River Po that extends approximately 650 km (400 mi) in an east-west direction, with an area of 46,000 km² (17,756 mi²); it runs from the Western Alps to the Adriatic Sea.

Visible in the lower part of the image, on the island of Sicily, is Mount Etna, its peak capped with white snow. In the full image, some faint ash can be seen spreading eastward from the volcano’s caldera, as Etna recently erupted for the third time in 2012 (click here for an article on the recent eruption).

Turin and Milan Near the Alps, Italy – February 22nd, 2012

45.4N 9.1E

February 22nd, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Mountains

Italy - February 2nd, 2012

This orthoctified wide-swath ASAR image shows the contours of the Alps, arching across northern Italy. The Alps is one of the great mountain range systems of Europe, stretching from Austria and Slovenia in the east through Italy, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Germany to France in the west.

Much of the southern edge of the Alps is clearly delimited by the basin of the River Po. Here the cities of Milan (center) and Turin (left) can be seen near the foot of the Alps, appearing as bright white areas in the Po Valley. Visible along the southern part of the valley is the beginning of the Apennines mountain chain. The boundary between the Apennines and the Alps is usually taken to be the Colle di Cadibona, at 435 m above sea level, above Savona on the Italian coast.

Sediments Along Adriatic Coast, Italy – October 22nd, 2011

42.8N 12.1E

October 22nd, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Mountains

Italy - October 18th, 2011

Sediments line the eastern coast of Italy, along the Adriatic Sea. By the western coast, an area of convection can be observed over the Gulf of Genoa (Golfo di Genova), the northernmost part of the Ligurian Sea.

Also of note is the partially snow-capped arch of the Alps in the upper part of the image. South of the mountains is the valley of the River Po, in northern Italy. The terrain becomes mountainous once more (the Apennines) as one moves southward along the backbone of the Italian peninsula.

Thick Clouds Over Po Valley, Between Alps and Apennines, Italy – February 1st, 2011

44.9N 10.7E

February 1st, 2011 Category: Clouds, Image of the day, Lakes, Mountains

Italy - January 16th, 2011

While the white snow on the Alps serves to highlight their ridges and differentiate them from the valleys below, the Italian terrain to the south is completely obscured by thick, white clouds.

This cloud cover rests between the Alps and the Apennines, sits over the Po Valley, and spreads out over Venice and the Adriatic. Lake Garda, however, is visible at the base of the Alps and just at the beginning of the thick fog layer.

Features of the Italian Peninsula in Summer

41.8N 15.7E

July 27th, 2010 Category: Mountains

Italy - June 25th, 2010

Italy - June 25th, 2010

The Italian Peninsula juts out into the Mediterranean Sea and cuts across this image diagonally. The spine of the peninsula is formed by the Apennine Mountains, which appear mostly snow free due to the high summer temperatures.

A large valley can be seen to the north; this is the valley of the River Po, south of the Alps. Following the valley to the coastal plains and moving southward, the Gargano promontory can be observed, surrounded by bluish green sediments.

Moving westward across the Apennines, several lakes can be seen near the coast. Two of these, Lake  Bolsena (closer to the mountains) and Lake Bracciano (closer to the coast), stand out due to their dark blue color.

Located near the tip of the peninsula is the Italian island of Sicily. Some green mountain ranges can be observed, particularly to the northeast; however, much of the island appears dry due to the high summer temperatures and strong sun.

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