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Posts tagged Pinacate Peaks

Colorado River Mouth and Gran Desierto de Altar, USA and Mexico – November 24th, 2011

31.9N 114.4W

November 24th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Rivers, Volcanoes

Mexico - November 23rd, 2011

The Colorado River is a river in the Southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 2,330 kilometers (1,450 mi) long. Here, it can be seen at its mouth, empyting tan sediments into the Gulf of California between the Baja California peninsula and mainland Mexico.

Visible extending across much of the northern border of the Gulf of California, is the Gran Desierto de Altar. One of the major portions of the Sonoran Desert of Mexico, including the only active erg dune region in North America, it reaches more than 100 kilometers east to west, and over 50 km north to south.

The dark brown area amidst the desert sands is the Pinacate Peaks (Sierra Pinacate), a group of volcanic peaks and cinder cones located mostly in the Mexican state of Sonora along the international border adjacent to the U.S. state of Arizona, surrounded by the vast sand dune field of the Gran Desierto de Altar, at the desert’s southeast.

Gran Desierto de Altar Between Salton Sea and Sea of Cortez, USA and Mexico

32.7N 115W

December 26th, 2010 Category: Deserts, Lakes, Volcanoes

Mexico - December 23rd, 2010

The large body of water in the upper left corner is the Salton Sea, a saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault in California, near the border with Mexico.

The sea is fed by the New, Whitewater, and Alamo rivers, as well as a number of minor agricultural drainage systems and creeks. The green sediments in the Sea of Cortez (or Gulf of California) in the bottom half of the image, however, are from a different river: the Colorado River.

Between the Salton Sea and the Sea of Cortez lies the Gran Desierto de Altar, part of the Sonoran Desert. A dark brown, almost circular area can be seen in the lower part of the dune field: the Pinacate Peaks (Sierra Pinacate), a volcanic group of volcanic peaks and cinder cones.

Agriculture Between Salton Sea and Gran Desierto de Altar, USA and Mexico – July 27th, 2010

31.8N 113.6W

July 27th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers, Volcanoes

Mexico - June 23rd, 2010

Mexico - June 23rd, 2010

Greenish sediments flow forth from the Colorado River, around Montague Island, and into the Sea of Cortes, left of the image center. Upon opening the full image, more of the sea and the Baja California peninsula in Mexico can be observed.

Near the north shores of the sea is the Gran Desierto de Altar, part of the Sonoran Desert. The dark brown circular area amidst the tan dunes is the Pinacate Peaks (Sierra Pinacate), a volcanic group of volcanic peaks and cinder cones.

Following the river northwards, one comes to an irrigated area in this arid region – the Imperial Valley in southern California. Continuing northwards through the agricultural zone, one finds the Salton Sea, a saline lake. The largest such lake in California, it covers a surface area of approximately 376 sq mi (970 km2).

Pinacate Peaks and Gran Desierto de Altar, Mexico

31.7N 113.5W

March 20th, 2010 Category: Mountains, Volcanoes

USA - March 5th, 2010

USA - March 5th, 2010

The Pinacate Peaks (Sierra Pinacate), identifiable as a dark brown area in the lower left quadrant, are a volcanic group of volcanic peaks and cinder cones. They are located mostly in the Mexican state of Sonora along the international border adjacent to the U.S. state of Arizona, surrounded by the vast sand dune field of the Gran Desierto de Altar.

The tallest of the peaks is Cerro del Pinacate (also called Volcán Santa Clara), elevation 3,904 feet (1,190 m). The volcanoes here have erupted here sporadically since about 4 million years ago, probably in association with the opening of the Gulf of California. The most recent volcanic activity was about 11,000 years ago.

Pinacate Peaks Amidst Sand Dunes of the Gran Desierto de Altar, Mexico

31.7N 114.7W

November 30th, 2009 Category: Rivers, Volcanoes

Mexico - November 17th, 2009

Mexico - November 17th, 2009

The Colorado River pours thick tan sediments around Montague Island and into the Sea of Cortes. The sediments gradually take on a greenish appearance as they diffuse southward.

North of the rivermouth is the Gran Desierto de Altar, part of the Sonoran Desert. The desert’s vast sand dune field appears mostly tan here, with the exception of a dark brown circular area in the upper right quadrant.

This part of the desert is the location of the Pinacate Peaks, a group of volcanic peaks and cinder cones. The tallest of the peaks is Cerro del Pinacate (also called Volcan Santa Clara), elevation 3,904 feet (1,190 m).

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