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Typhoon Bopha (26W) Passes Over Philippines – December 5th, 2012

14.2N 121.0E

December 5th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Bopha (26W) – December 3rd, 2012

Typhoon Bopha (26W) - December 4th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 26W

Typhoon Bopha (TY 26W) is a powerful late-season tropical cyclone which formed unusually close to the equator. It is currently located approximately 175 nautical miles north-northwest of Zamboanga, Philippines. At the time this image was captured, however, the storm was still situated by the southeast side of the archipelago.

The system has since passed over the southern part of the Philippines, tracked west-northwestward at 16 knots over the last six hours. After affecting Palau, Bopha made landfall over Mindanao late on December 3, an island devastated by Washi in December 2011, becoming the strongest tropical cyclone ever to hit Mindanao in the past 2 decades. Maximum significant wave height is 29 feet.

Typhoon Bopha (26W) East of Philippines

7.4N 134.9E

December 3rd, 2012 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Bopha (26W) – December 2nd, 2012

Enhanced image

Typhoon Bopha (26W) - December 2nd, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 26W

Typhoon Bopha (STY 26W) has tracked westward at 15 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 48 feet. The system is located approximately 185 nm west of Palau, is an island country that is geographically part of the larger island group of Micronesia, in the western Pacific Ocean. Visible west of the system are the Philippines.

Typhoon Saola (10W) Causes Problems in Philippines – July 30th, 2012

17.9N 119.9E

July 30th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Saola – July 30th, 2012

Enhanced image

Tropical Storm Saola - July 30th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Tropical Storm Saola

On July 22, a tropical disturbance formed east-northeast of Palau. Late on July 26, the JMA upgraded the system to a tropical depression.

On July 27, the JTWC issued a TCFA on the system. Early on July 28, the JTWC upgraded the system to a tropical depression, whilst the JMA upgraded it to a tropical storm and named it Saola. Soon, the PAGASA upgraded the system to a tropical depression and named it Gener. Later that day, the JTWC upgraded Saola to a tropical storm. Early on July 29, the JMA upgraded Saola to a severe tropical storm.

Saola caused widespread rains in the Philippines due to the enhancement of the southwest monsoon. On July 29, domestic and international flights throughout the country were delayed and cancelled. Small fishing boats were advised not to enter the water as gale warnings were issued by PAGASA. Flooding is imminent as different dams are expected to reach critical levels. Three roads in northern Luzon was impassable due to floods and landslides. About sixty families in Rodriguez, Rizal were evacuated due to severe flooding in the area.

 

Tropical Storm Doksuri (07W) Near Philippines

18.8N 118.5E

June 29th, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Doksuri – June 28th, 2012

Enhanced image

Track of TS 07W - June 28th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 07W

On June 21, a tropical disturbance formed east of Yap, and it developed multiple vortices.

Early on June 25, a vortex developed well within the low-pressure area, prompting the JMA considering it as a tropical depression north of Palau; also, the JTWC issued a TCFA on the system later that day.

On June 26, the PAGASA upgraded the system to a tropical depression and named it Dindo. Later that day, the JMA upgraded the system to a tropical storm and named it Doksuri, and the JTWC upgraded Doksuri to a tropical depression. Late on the same day, the JTWC upgraded Doksuri to a tropical storm.

On June 27, Doksuri’s low-level circulation center became exposed due to moderate easterly wind shear. On June 28, the JTWC downgraded Doksuri to a tropical depression, as the system’s exposed circulation center began to underwent a usual circulation center replacement cycle, which involves a circulation center to be replaced by another new circulation center. On June 29, the HKO issued the strong wind signal No.1 as it was located 120 kilometers from Hong Kong.

Area of Convection Close to Palau

February 4th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Area of convection - February 4th, 2009

Area of convection - February 4th, 2009

Area of convection - enhanced image

Area of convection - enhanced image

The area of convection previously located near 5.2N 139.1E is now located near 5.8N 137.3E.

It is approximately 180 nautical miles east-southeast of Palau, an island nation about 500 miles (800 km) east of the Philippines.

Recent animated infrared satellite imagery shows deep convection developing along a convergent band on the northern periphery of a weak low level circulation center (LLCC).

This disturbance lies equatorward of an upper-level anticyclone axis in an area of moderate easterly vertical wind shear and strong westward diffluence aloft.

Microwave imagery indicates some improvement in low level structure over the past several hours.

However, the 24 hours pressure trend from Palau is negligible, suggesting that the disturbance has not deepened significantly during the same period.

Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 12 to 17 knots. Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 1006mb.

Due to the fact that the LLCC is weak and vertical wind shear unfavorably strong, the potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours remains poor.

source JTWC

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