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Posts tagged Padma River

Sediments Along Coast of Bangladesh

22.4N 89.9E

April 17th, 2012 Category: Rivers, Sediments

Bangladesh - April 14th, 2012

Sediments line the coast of Bangladesh in the Bay of Bengal, pouring out from the innumerous rivers and channels along the country’s coastline. Visible on the left side of the image is the Sundarban forest, lying in the vast delta on the Bay of Bengal formed by the super confluence of the Padma, Brahmaputra and Meghna rivers across southern Bangladesh. The Sundarbans is intersected by a complex network of tidal waterways, mudflats and small islands of salt-tolerant mangrove forests.

Hoogly River and Sundarbans, Coastal India and Bangladesh – December 4th, 2011

22.3N 88.2E

December 4th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Wetlands

India - November 26th, 2011

Rivers in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh can be observed on the right side of this image, empyting sediments into the Bay of Bengal. Visible near the image center is the wide Hooghly River, a distributary of the Ganges River of approximately 260 kilometres (160 mi) in length.

To the east of the Hooghly River is the Sundarbans, the largest single block of tidal halophytic mangrove forest in the world. The forest lies in the vast delta on the Bay of Bengal formed by the super confluence of the Padma, Brahmaputra and Meghna rivers across southern Bangladesh. The seasonally-flooded Sundarbans freshwater swamp forests lie inland from the mangrove forests on the coastal fringe.

Confluence of Padma and Jamuna Rivers, Bangladesh

23.7N 89.7E

November 20th, 2011 Category: Rivers

Bangladesh - November 9th, 2011

This APM image shows the confluence of the Padma River (left) and Jamuna River (above), in Bangladesh. The Jamuna is one of the country’s three main rivers. The Brahmaputra-Jamuna is a classic example of a braided river and is highly susceptible to channel migration and avulsion.

The Jamuna is the main distributary channel of the Brahmaputra River as it flows out of India into Bangladesh. The Jamuna then flows south and joins the Padma River (Pôdda) near Goalundo Ghat. Merged with the Padma (Pôdda), it meets the Meghna River near Chandpur. Its waters then flow into the Bay of Bengal as the Meghna River.

 

Sundarbans and Delta Area on Bay of Bengal, Southern Bangladesh

22.1N 89.9E

November 19th, 2011 Category: Rivers, Wetlands

Bangladesh - November 9th, 2011

This APM image shows the  vast delta on the Bay of Bengal formed by the super confluence of the Padma, Brahmaputra and Meghna rivers across Saiyan, in southern Bangladesh.

The area is home to the Sundarbans, the largest single block of tidal halophytic mangrove forest in the world. The seasonally-flooded Sundarbans freshwater swamp forests lie inland from the mangrove forests on the coastal fringe.

The Sundarbans is intersected by a complex network of tidal waterways, mudflats and small islands of salt-tolerant mangrove forests. The interconnected network of waterways makes almost every corner of the forest accessible by boat.

Sediments in Ganges Delta and Gulf of Martaban, Bangladesh and Myanmar – November 11th, 2011

20.0N 93.4E

November 11th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Myanmar and Bangladesh - November 8th, 2011

Two large, sediment filled bays can be seen in this image of Bangladesh (left) and Myanmar (right). Visible in southern Myanmar is the Gulf of Martaban, filled with sediments by the Salween Sittaung and Yangon Rivers. Visible in Bangladesh is the Ganges Delta, where sediments enter into the Bay of Bengal.

The Ganges Delta (also known as the Ganges–Brahmaputra Delta, the Sunderbans Delta, or the Bengalla Delta) is a river delta in Bangladesh and the state of West Bengal, India. It is the world’s largest delta, approximately 350 km (220 mi) across at the Bay of Bengal.

A number of large rivers flow through the Ganges Delta, including the Padma (main distributary of the Ganges) and the Jamuna (main distributary of the Brahmaputra), which merge and then join the Meghna before entering the sea.

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