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Posts tagged Outer Banks

USA from Pamlico Sound to Appalachian Mountains

35.3N 75.8W

November 12th, 2012 Category: Mountains, Sediments

USA – November 10th, 2012

Green sediments create swirled patterns in Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, and along the Outer Banks, the row of low, sandy barrier islands that separate the sound from the Atlantic Ocean. At 129 km (80 mi) long and 24 to 48 km (15 to 30 miles) wide, it is the largest lagoon along the east coast of the USA. Pamlico Sound is linked on the north with Albemarle Sound through Roanoke Sound and Croatan Sound (passages).

Also of interest in this image are the Appalachian Mountains, visible upon opening the full version. The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east-west travel as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to any road running east-west. These alternating ridges and valleys are easily discernible as alternating brown and green lines.

Bays and Sounds in North Carolina and Virginia, USA

37.2N 76W

May 5th, 2012 Category: Lakes

USA - April 17th, 2012

Sediments cloud two large sounds by the coast of North Carolina, separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a chain of low-laying, sandy barrier islands known as the Outer Banks. The light green sound is Pamlico Sound, and the greyish brown sound above it is Albemarle Sound.

The former is the largest lagoon along the east coast of the USA, with a length of 129 km (80 mi) and a width that ranges from 24 to 48 km (15 to 30 miles). The sediments in the sound come from rivers such as the Neuse and the Pamlico.

Visible to the north of the two sounds, in the upper right quadrant, is Cape Charles, a headland in Northampton County, Virginia. It forms the northern side of the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. Cape Henry, which forms the southern side of the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay, and Cape Charles are collectively known as the Virginia Capes.

Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds, North Carolina, USA

35.3N 75.8W

April 11th, 2012 Category: Lakes

USA - April 9th, 2012

Two large sounds can be seen by the Atlantic Coast of the state of North Carolina: Pamlico Sound (greenish, below) and Albemarle Sound (darker green and brown, above). Both sounds are separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a row of low, sandy barrier islands.

Pamlico Sound is the largest lagoon along the U.S. East Coast, being 129 km (80 mi) long and 24 to 48 km (15 to 30 miles) wide. The Neuse and Pamlico rivers (the latter is the estuary of the Tar River) flow in from the west. Pamlico Sound is linked on the north with Albemarle Sound through Roanoke Sound and Croatan Sound (passages). Much of the water in the Albemarle Sound is brackish or fresh, as opposed to the saltwater of the ocean, as a result of river water pouring into the sound.

Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds by Coast of North Carolina, USA – January 8th, 2012

35.3N 75.8W

January 8th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

USA - January 4th, 2012

Visible by the coast of North Carolina, USA, are the Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds. The waters of the former appear greyish green in color, while those of the latter appear brownish. The two are linked by the passages of the Roanoke Sound and Croatan Sound.

Pamlico Sound is the largest lagoon along the U.S. East Coast, being 129 km long and 24 to 48 km (15 to 30 miles) wide. It is a body of water separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a row of low, sandy barrier islands. The sound and its ocean inlets are noted for wide expanses of shallow water and occasional shoaling, making the area hazardous for larger vessels.

Albemarle Sound is a large estuary located at the confluence of a group of rivers, including the Chowan and Roanoke. It is also separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks. Much of the water in the Albemarle Sound is brackish or fresh, as opposed to the saltwater of the ocean, as a result of river water pouring into the sound.

Albermarle Sound and the Great Dismal Swamp, USA – June 21st, 2009

34.6N 77W

June 21st, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Albermarle Sound, USA - June 10th, 2009

Albermarle Sound, USA - June 10th, 2009

Albemarle Sound is a large estuary on the coast of North Carolina in the United States located at the confluence of a group of rivers, including the Chowan and Roanoke.

It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a long barrier peninsula. Much of the water in the Albemarle Sound is brackish or fresh, as opposed to the saltwater of the ocean, as a result of river water pouring into the sound.

Here, the water of the sound appears dark blue and mostly clear of sediments. The waters of the Chesapeake Bay (partially visible, above) and the Pamlico Sound (partially visible, below), on the other hand, have a green tinge.

Inland, between Albemarle Sound and Chesapeake Bay, is the Great Dismal Swamp, a marshy region on the Coastal Plain of southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina.

The dark blue circular area in its center is Lake Drummond, with a surface area of approximately 3,142 acres (13 km2) and a maximum depth of six feet.

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