Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Ob River

Ob River and Snow Across West Siberian Plain, Russia

54.2N 81.8E

February 3rd, 2011 Category: Rivers

Russia - January 17th, 2011

The part of this image that appears uniformly white is part of the West Siberian Plain, in Russia. Much of the plain is poorly drained and consists of some of the world’s largest swamps and floodplains.

The large, parallel dark streaks across the snowy plain are raised bogs in areas of peatlands. As these bogs have an elevation that is higher than the rest of the plain, they are not covered in snow.

Visible along the edge of the plain and to the north is the Ob River. The river’s surface is also frozen and snow covered, lending it its white appearance.

Dark Brown Sediments in Gulf of Ob, Russia – August 14th, 2010

68.8N 73.5E

August 14th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Russia - July 30th, 2010

The dark brown body of water towards the center of this image is the Gulf of Ob (also known as Ob Bay). It is an immense bay of the Arctic Ocean in Northern Russia, at the head of which is the mouth of the Ob River.

This Gulf flows into the Kara Sea between the Yamal and the Gydan peninsulas. It is about 1,000 km (600 mi) long and varies from about 50 km (30 mi) to 80 km (50 mi) in width, running generally north and south.

Here, the bay appears dark brown in color due to the presence of sediments from the Ob River and to its relative shallowness, with an average depth from ten to twelve metres.

Confluence of Biya and Katun Rivers Forming the Ob River, Russia

52.5N 85.2E

May 10th, 2010 Category: Mountains, Rivers

Russia - April 28th, 2010

Russia - April 28th, 2010

The Ob River crosses the upper half of this orthorectified image of western Siberia, Russia. It is the country’s fourth longest river and is famous for having the longest estuary in the world.

Here, the Ob can be observed at its origin: the confluence of the Biya and Katun Rivers, 16 miles (26 km) southwest of Biysk in Altai Krai (the city is visible upon opening the full image).

Both the Biya and the Katun have their origin in the Altai Mountains, visible here in the lower part of the image. The former issues from Lake Teletskoye; the latter, 80 miles (130 km) long, bursts out of a glacier on Mount Byelukha.

many square and rectangular fields can be seen near the river’s banks. Further south, the peaks of the Altai Mountains

Ob River Crossing West Siberian Plain, Russia

53.3N 82.9E

April 8th, 2010 Category: Rivers

Russia - March 5th, 2010

Russia - March 5th, 2010

The West Siberian Plain is a large plain that occupies the western portion of Siberia and Russia. Much of the plain is poorly drained and consists of some of the world’s largest swamps and floodplains. In fact, it is one of the world’s largest areas of peatlands, which are characterized by raised bogs. Here some of those marshy areas appear as greyish streaks across the white, snow-covered landscape.

The plain covers an area of more than 975,000 sq.mi. It has been described as the world’s largest unbroken lowland—more than 50 percent is less than 330 feet (100 m) above sea level— and covers an area of about 2.6–2.7 million km² which is about one third of Siberia. It extends from north to south for 2,400 km, from the Arctic Ocean to the foothills of the Altay Mountains, and from west to east for 1,900 km from the Yenisei River to the Ural Mountains.

The principal rivers in the West Siberian Plain are the Ob, Irtysh, and Yenisei. Here, the Ob River is visible in the upper right quadrant. Glacial deposits on the plain extend as far south as the Ob-Irtysh confluence, forming occasional low hills and ridges, but otherwise the plain is exceedingly flat and featureless.

Sediments in Gulf of Ob and Khalmyer Bay, Russia – August 13th, 2009

72.3N 75.2E

August 13th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Russia - July 27th, 2009

Russia - July 27th, 2009

The long, narrow Gydan Peninsula in Russian Siberia separates the Gulf of Ob (left) from the Khalmyer Bay (right). Both bodies of water are loaded with sediments, although the former is dark brown in color while the latter appears yellow and green.

The Gulf of Ob is an immense bay of the Arctic Ocean in Northern Russia, at the head of which is the mouth of the Ob River. This Gulf flows into the Kara Sea between the Yamal Peninsula (lower left quadrant) and the Gydan Peninsula.

The Gulf is about 1,000 km (600 mi) long and varies from about 50 km (30 mi) to 80 km (50 mi) in width, running generally north and south. It is relatively shallow, with an average depth from ten to twelve metres which restricts heavy sea transport.

Khalmyer Bay, on the other hand, is roughly 185 km long and 47 km wide at its widest point. This deep bay lies in the Kara Sea between the estuaries of the Ob and the Yenisei River. Khalmyer Bay is surrounded by tundra coast and there are numerous river mouths on its shores.