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Posts tagged Northwest Territories

Sediments in Great Slave Lake, Canada

61.6N 113.7W

September 9th, 2011 Category: Lakes

Canada - August 5th, 2011

Thick tan sediments spill into the Great Slave Lake, the second-largest lake in the Northwest Territories of Canada, the deepest lake in North America at 614 m, and the ninth-largest lake in the world.

The lake is 480 km long and 19 to wide. It covers an area of 27200 km2 in the southern part of the territory. Its volume is 2090 km3.

The Hay, Slave and Taltson Rivers are its chief tributaries. It is drained by the Mackenzie River. Though the western shore is forested, the east shore and northern arm are tundra-like. The southern and eastern shores reach the edge of the Canadian Shield.

Sediments Pour from Mackenzie River into Beaufort Sea, Canada – November 11th, 2010

69.5N 133.3W

November 11th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Canada - September 7th, 2010

Brown sediments pour from the mouth of the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea, part of the Arctic Ocean. Multiple braided channels can be seen in the delta area by the mouth. The sediments are darkest brown near the shore, where they are densest, and become lighter tan and then green as they disperse into the sea.

The river, whose mean discharge at the mouth is 10,700 cubic metres per second (380,000 cu ft/s), originates in the Great Slave Lake, in Canada’s Northwest Territories, and flows north. It is the longest river in Canada at 1,738 kilometres (1,080 mi).

Sediments from Mackenzie River, Canada – August 19th, 2010

69.0N 135.9W

August 19th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Canada - July 21st, 2010

The Mackenzie River spills a load of dense brown sediments into the Beaufort Sea, part of the Arctic Ocean. Its mean discharge is 10,700 cubic metres per second (380,000 cu ft/s). The Mackenzie and its tributaries drain 1,805,200 square kilometres (697,000 sq mi).

The river originates in the Great Slave Lake, in Canada’s Northwest Territories, and flows north. It is the longest river in Canada at 1,738 kilometres (1,080 mi) and, together with its headstreams the Peace and the Finlay, the second longest river in North America at 4,241 kilometres (2,635 mi) in length.

Wave Clouds by Great Slave Lake, Canada – July 15th, 2010

62.8N 113.8W

July 15th, 2010 Category: Clouds, Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Canada - June 29th, 2010

Canada - June 29th, 2010

The Great Slave Lake is 480 km (300 mi) long and 19 to 109 km (12 to 68 mi) wide, covering an area of 27,200 km2 (10,502 sq mi) in the southern part of Canada’s Northwest Territories, making it the second-largest lake in that province.

Here, tan sediments are visible by the southern shores of the lake. Moving to the right, many islands can be seen in the East Arm of the lake. Several smaller lakes of various colors can be observed by the northwestern shores, while the land by the northeastern shores is partially covered by wave clouds.

Akimiski Island in James Bay, Canada

53.0N 82.1W

May 13th, 2010 Category: Sediments

Canada - May 12th, 2010

Canada - May 12th, 2010

James Bay (lower left quadrant), in Canada, is 275 miles (443 km) long and 135 miles (217 km) wide. Here, it appears mostly iced over, as does much of the Hudson Bay, to which it connects to the north.

James Bay contains numerous islands, all of which are administered by the Northwest Territories. Akimiski, the largest island, has an area of 1,159 square miles (3,002 square km). The northern side of the island is framed by ice, while the southern side is not, showing bright green and golden colored sediments in the nearby waters.