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Posts tagged North Korea

Snow-Capped Baekdu Mountain, China and North Korea

42.0N 128.0E

May 23rd, 2013 Category: Mountains

China and Korea – May 23rd, 2013

Baekdu Mountain, also known in China as Changbai Mountain and Baitou Mountain, is an active volcanic mountain on the border between North Korea and China. It is visible here by way of its snow-capped peak, near the image center.

At 2,744 m (9,003 ft), it is the highest mountain of the Changbai mountain range to the north and Baekdudaegan mountain range to the south. It is also the highest mountain in the Korean Peninsula and in northeastern China. A large crater lake, called Heaven Lake, is in the caldera atop the mountain.

Smoke Over Parts of China and North Korea

40.3N 125.2E

June 26th, 2011 Category: Fires

Korea - June 21st, 2011

Smoke hangs in the air over northeast China and part of North Korea, just northwest of the Korean Peninsula, in East Asia.

The Korean Peninsula extends southwards for about 684 miles (1,100 km) from continental Asia into the Pacific Ocean and is surrounded by the Sea of Japan (East Sea) to the south, and the Yellow Sea to the west, the Korea Strait connecting the first two bodies of water.

Snow-Capped Dome of Baekdu Mountain, North Korea and China

42.0N 128.0E

June 9th, 2011 Category: Volcanoes

China and North Korea - May 23rd, 2011

The snow-capped dome just northeast of the image center is Baekdu Mountain, also known as Changbai Mountain in China, a volcanic mountain on the border between North Korea and China.

At 2744 m, it is the highest mountain of the Changbai mountain range to the north and Baekdudaegan mountain range to the south. It is also the highest mountain on the Korean peninsula and Manchuria.

Sediments in Korea Bay and Incheon Bay, North and South Korea – March 25th, 2011

38.1N 125.4E

March 25th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Korean Peninsula - March 11th, 2011

Sediments pour off the western coast of the Korean Peninsula and into the Yellow Sea. They are particularly concentrated in Korea Bay (above) and Incheon Bay (center, below).

Incheon Bay is located by the border between North Korea and South Korea, and is famous for its high tidal range. Korea Bay, also called West Korea Bay, is located in the northern part of the Yellow Sea, between Liaoning Province of China and North P’yŏngan Province of North Korea.

Korea Bay is separated from the Bohai Sea by the Liaodong Peninsula, with Dalian at its southernmost point. The Yalu (Amnok) River, which marks the border between China and North Korea, empties into the Korea Bay between Dandong (China) and Sinŭiju (North Korea).

Tan Sediments in Incheon Bay, Korean Peninsula

37.4N 126.7E

March 5th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Korea - February 11th, 2011

Tan sediments are present in Incheon Bay, a bay on the west side of the Korean Peninsula by the border between North Korea and South Korea. Incheon Bay is famous for its high tidal range.

Inland, the port city of Incheon and the capital city of Seoul can be seen in South Korea near the bay. Incheon is one of South Korea’s four largest cities. It is the largest seaport on the west coast and the second largest port in the country.

The Seoul National Capital Area includes the Incheon metropolis, making it the world’s second largest metropolitan area with over 24.5 million inhabitants. Almost half of South Korea’s population live in the Seoul National Capital Area.

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